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#WEFAfrica2017: Thinking out the box by putting the farm in one

World Economic Forum
Durban – In this age of Eat Local campaigns, one might be a little alarmed to encounter vegetables called rucola, petite-this and mange-that, on a plate in the Nigerian capital, but fear not, Oluwayimika Angel Adelaja told a briefing at the World Economic Forum's (WEF) Africa meetings on Friday, these microgreens are not just grown near Abuja, they are grown within the teeming metropolis.

This young Nigerian, a winner of the World Economic Forum's Top Women Innovators Award, has turned adversity and a modern city's hunger for imported vegetables into a thriving business.

Her business is growing microgreens in shipping containers in town, allowing her to add "hyper local" to the tag.

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Farmer and innovator Angel Adelaja is a winner of the World Economic Forum's Top Women Innovators Award. Picture: Siobhan Cassidy/ANA PicturesMaxwell Hall of the World Economic Forum interviews Oluwayimika Angel Adelaja, founder and CEO of Fresh Direct Produce and Agro-Allied Services at WEF Africa 2017 in Durban. Picture: ANA PicturesAngel Adelaja, centre, and her fellow winners of the World Economic Forum's Top Women Innovators Award, South Africans Darlene Menzies, left, Finfind CEO, and Aisha Pandor, SweepSouth CEO. Picture: Siobhan Cassidy/ANA Pictures

The founder and chief executive of Fresh Direct Produce and Agro-Allied Services in Nigeria said her business started with a regular farm, but making a success of that proved so challenging that she was forced to innovate.

The business started with 10 greenhouses on a leased 300 hectare farm. The green houses took up only a small part of the land, with the rest covered with trees.

Beside the cost of clearing, which would have been exorbitant, Angel said, she had a problem with the idea of displacing forest. An additional problem was that the farm was three hours from market.

As any farmer will confirm, this business is not for the faint-hearted. Angel told the briefing on the last day of the WEF Africa meetings in Durban that small farmers like herself could expect to lose up to 50 percent of their crop before harvest.

Lack of funds compounds problems around a shortage of information and lack of inputs and tools. Access to finance would be a game changer for farmers, but bank loans are usually available only to landowners in Nigeria.

"First I need to be rich before I can get a loan," Angel said.

Transporting often-delicate, perishable goods along bad roads and a lack of storage facilities added to problems which meant that, she added, another 25 percent of produce could be lost from farm to market.

Another challenge that forced a rethink of the business was when the fuel price increased from 87 Naira a litre to above 200 Naira in a short period of time. It was these and other challenges that forced Fresh Direct to innovate and "pivot", as she described it, and develop their genius plan to grow vegetables in town.

The business now grows microgreens in containers stacked five high at two sites in Abuja. Each 20-foot shipping container would fit a car – instead they take 4 000 plants per cycle, with a cycle lasting from seven days to a month.

The vegetables are produced using a hydroponic method where plants are grown in nutrient-filled water, rather than soil. The business is moving into aquaponics too, where fish are added to the system to enhance the cycle.

This is a long way away from fast food, but the vegetables can be delivered to customers 15 minutes after they are harvested and washed.

Fresh Direct's customers are restaurants, hotels and grocery stores. "The nice thing with corporate customers is that they are consistent," Angel said.

An outlet in Lagos will soon be added to the two already operating in Abuja.

In Lagos, Angel said she expects to tap into an ever bigger demand for microgreens, niche foods that are a favourite of modern chefs, foodies and other hipster types.

Fresh Direct currently employs 10 people full-time and another 59 part-time, many of whom would find it hard to secure good jobs elsewhere.

Angel told the WEF briefing that not one of her staff had gone to secondary school and just one has previous agricultural experience.

She said her staff call themselves "tech farmers" in a country where farming is sometimes looked down on as a less-than-dignified career.

Angel clearly doesn’t look down on traditional farming. In fact, she seemed pleased and relieved to say that doing the fancy vegetables, rather than staple foods, meant she was not competing with traditional rural farmers, rather they are providing vegetables that are otherwise imported.

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