Cobus Coetzee and Sapa

THE pilot, the Hollywood star and the garment that was almost a wedding dress.

These were probably the three most memorable outfits that MPs and guests wore to the opening of Parliament and President Jacob Zuma’s State of the Nation address yesterday.

Photographers and journalists whistled at MPs and guests to get their attention as they posed on the red carpet before the Poorthuys entrance of the Old Assembly building.

Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba wore an SA Airways pilot uniform.

Topped with gold epaulettes and a captain’s hat, Gigaba saluted and said he was wearing the uniform because he “supported” SAA.

Public Protector Thuli Madonsela looked like a Hollywood actress in a dazzling, full-length golden gown.

“The dress makes me feel light and a little playful,” she said. DA parliamentary leader Lindiwe Mazibuko was the other show-stopper.

Photographers rushed to take pictures of her after someone shouted “It is Lindiwe” when she walked down the red carpet.

Mazibuko wore a white silver gown made of raw silk and designed by Kat van Duinen.

The dress had a long train and Mazibuko had to continuously look behind her to make sure no one stepped on it.

Parliament’s Arts and Culture Portfolio Committee chairwoman, Thandile Sunduza, also made a few rounds on the red carpet.

She showed off her baby bump in a yellow strapless short dress which she had designed herself.

“I’m seven months pregnant. If you ask who’s the father, I don’t know,” she joked, before moving off.

ANC MP Gloria Borman wore a colourful African outfit with matching headscarf.

“I wore a colourful outfit because it is time to celebrate, we have 20 years of democracy,” she said.

Western Cape Premier Helen Zille was dressed in a lime-green, beaded ball gown. She was accompanied by her husband, Johann Maree.

Asked what their plans were for Valentine’s Day today, she said: “We’re going to have a good time. We’ve been married for 31 years.”

Zuma arrived with his wife MaKhumalo and National Assembly Speaker Max Sisulu.

They walked from the Slave Lodge to the entrance of the National Assembly, where Zuma took the national salute.

There was a 21-gun salute and a flypast, while police officers stood on all the roofs around him, including Tuynhuys.

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