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What political parties are promising

Jobs, economic growth, health, education and fighting corruption dominate the 2014 election manifestos launched across the political landscape.

But what are the precise undertakings and what else is on offer in political parties’ respective bids to have South Africa’s record 25 390 150 registered voters make their crosses in the May 7 elections marking 20 years of democracy? Senior Political Correspondent, Marianne Merten, takes a look at the offerings by the usual election contenders and the debutantes.

2732014/02/23Manifesto launch of EFF at Tembisa Mehlareng stadiumPicture: Nicholas Thabo Tau. Credit: INLSA

ANC

President: Jacob Zuma

2009: 65.9 percent, or 11 650 748 votes

2004: 69.69 percent, or 10 880 915 votes

1999: 66.35 percent, or 10 601 330 votes

Current parliamentary seats: 264 National Assembly, 35 National Council of Provinces

2014 election promises:

“Moving South Africa Forward”

DA

Leader: Helen Zille

2009: 16.66 percent, or 2 945 829 votes

2004: 13.7 percent, or 1 931 201 votes

1999: The DA did not exist yet, but its predecessor the Democratic Party polled 9.56 percent, or 1 527 337 votes

Current parliamentary seats: 67 National Assembly, 10 National Council of Provinces

2014 election promises:

“Together for Change, Together for Jobs”

COPE

President: Mosiuoa Lekota

2009: 7.42 percent, or 1 311 027 votes

2004: did not contest, was formed in 2008

Current parliamentary seats: 30 National Assembly, 7 National Council of Provinces

“South Africa Deserves a Better Government!”

AGANG SA

Leader: Dr Mamphela Ramphele

2009: Agang SA did not exist yet

“We Can Build a Winning South Africa, Together”

ECONOMIC FREEDOM FIGHTERS (EFF)

Commander-in-Chief: Julius Malema

2014 election promises:

“Now is the Time for Economic Freedom!”

IFP

President: Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi

2009: 4.55 percent, or 804 260 votes

2004: 6.97 percent, or 1 088 664 votes

1999: 8.58 percent, or 1 371 477 votes

Current parliamentary seats: 18 National Assembly, 1 National Council of Provinces

“The Power is Yours!”

UNITED DEMOCRATIC MOVEMENT (UDM)

President: Bantu Holomisa

2009: 0.85 percent, or 149 680 votes

2004: 2.28 percent, or 355 717 votes

1999: 3.42 percent, or 546 790 votes

Current parliamentary seats: 4 National Assembly

“Corruption Destroys the Gains of our Freedom”

FREEDOM FRONT PLUS

Leader: Dr Pieter Mulder

2009: 0.83 percent, or 146 796 votes

2004: 0.89 percent, or 139 465 votes

1999: 0.80 percent, or 127 217 votes

“It Is Time”

AFRICAN CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY (ACDP)

President: Reverend Kenneth Meshoe

2009: 0.81 percent, or 142 658 votes

2004: 1.6 percent, or 250 272 votes

1999: 1.43 percent, or 228 975 votes

Current parliamentary seats: 3 National Assembly

“Your Hope for a Great Future”

UNITED CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY (UCDP)

President: Isaac Mfundisi

2009: 0.37 percent, or 66 086 votes

2004: 0.75 percent, or 117 792 votes

1999: 0.78 percent, or 125 280 votes

Current Parliamentary seats: 2 National Assembly

2014 election promises

“Stand Up and Speak Out to Make A Change”

AFRICAN PEOPLE’S CONVENTION (APC)

President: Themba Godi

2009: 0.20 percent, or 35 867 votes

2004: 0.25 percent, or 39 116 votes

1999: the party did not exist yet

Current parliamentary seats: 1 National Assembly

“A Future for Everyone; Let Your Vote Work for You”

PAN-AFRICANIST CONGRESS of AZANIA (PAC)

President: Alton Mpheti

2009: 0.27 percent, or 48 530 votes

2004: 0.73 percent, or 113 512 votes

1999: 0.71 percent, or 113 125 votes

“Land Redistribution for Socio-economic Emancipation”

MINORITY FRONT (MF)

President: Shameen Thakur-Rajbansi

2009: 0.25 percent, or 43 474 votes

2004: 0.35 percent, or 55 267 votes

1999: 0.30 percent, or 48 277 votes

“One Vision, One Future”

AZANIAN PEOPLE’S ORGANISATION (Azapo)

President: Jake Koti Dikobo

2009: 0.22 percent, or 38 245 votes

1999: 0.17 percent, or 25 257 votes

2014 election promises

“Fulfilling the Promise of the Liberation Struggle”

(Sources: IEC, party political 2014 manifestos)

Note: The percentage support is calculated on votes received out of total votes cast, which increased by some 2 million to 23.18 million registered voters in 2009, up from 20.67 million in 2004 and 18.17 million registered voters in 1999.

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