Lyn Kritzinger founded Rainey Skyes more than 30 years ago. Back then antiques formed the bulk of what they sold; today, with daughter Lee on board, modern elements have crept in and old and new live comfortably side by side.

Lee says her Wembley home is an extension of the design philosophy behind their family business. It’s about heritage, but also about adapting to the times.

Throughout the home are beautiful old pieces of furniture with accents and accessories that point to modern-day trends in décor.

Her son’s room is an ode to the recent rise in popularity of the British monarchy. The cushions are spot on trend and fitted in well with the navy and red colour scheme he already had.

The decorator says she enjoys working with feature walls, as they are an inexpensive way in which to turn a room around. In this case she has opted for a natural woven textured wallpaper.

“Eyelet curtains have a masculinity about them, are fuss-free and I think are ideal for a boy’s room.”

She adds that clever storage solutions are necessary for teenagers.

In her son’s room trendy kists at the foot of his bed offer a place in which to house his gaming station.

“In my daughter’s bedroom we’ve put hooks inside the cupboards to hide clutter. We built storage into the bay window to store books. Her desk doubles up as a dressing table, by simply putting a mirror on the wall.”

Lee and her husband gave their kitchen a facelift by respraying all the cupboards in pastel colours and replacing old counter-tops with granite.

Amazing what paint can do, she says, adding that these days it’s not necessary to have tiles on the walls.

What is important is to use colour to create mood, she says.

In her bedroom, which she wanted to keep tranquil, Lee opted for duck-egg blue.

Simple things such as ornate frames on mirrors and pictures, scatter cushions on the bed or a lush, textured throw can add drama to a room.

Little things, like reading lamps tall enough for you to read under at night, make spaces functional and ultimately comfortable. - The Mercury