What's NEW on Zando?

Shop our latest arrivals for shoes & apparel now!

From warehouse to home-ware

Comment on this story


Copy of cw Decor_0302

INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERS

Object [o] House in Woodstock has a wide range of industrial-inspired furniture. A trestle table and chairs by Raw Studio. Picture: Candice Chaplin

London - Not so long ago disused warehouses and urban factories found in the less salubrious parts of towns and cities across Britain were the preserve of squatters and struggling artists.

These days, they are an aspirational living space for all, offering the kind of wide open spaces, high ceilings, exposed brickwork, rustic wooden beams and industrial gloss of Britain’s once-booming manufacturing trade that most of us can only dream of for our homes.

The industrial look, inspired by the glut of high-end warehouse and factory conversions of recent years, is one of the biggest trends of 2012, characterised by raw metals, concrete, reclaimed wood, unfinished surfaces and exposed fittings, as well as vintage and factory-style furniture and home accessories. The good news is that it can be incorporated into all types of home.

“From 18th-century country cottages and Victorian townhouses to modern beachfront homes and inner-city apartment blocks, the industrial finish is such an easy scheme to incorporate in your home, simply because it works so well in a blank modernist setting,” says Richard Morris, managing director of O SC ARS Interiors, an interior design service and online shop specialising in Victorian campaign furniture.

“Previously, an industrial cast-iron cheese press would have been sidelined for the scrap yard.

“Now, these pieces of industrial machinery can be seen taking centre stage in the modern-day home, not as an item compacting cheese but instead acting as a beautiful kitchen shelving unit or perhaps a bookcase with a twist.”

Copy of cw Decor_0284~1

Object [o] House in Woodstock, Cape Town has a wide range of industrial-inspired furniture. This cupboard was created by Raw Studio. Picture: Candice Chaplin

INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERS

“Industrial styling has a rawness that resonates with today’s homeowners,” says Peter Bowles, managing director of Davey Lighting, where original designs from its 19th-century past as a supplier to the shipbuilding industry can now be bought for use in the home.

“Where and how products are made or sourced has become a talking point. There’s a move away from assembly-line production towards thing that are made in factories. The focus is on craftsmanship, purpose and tradition, and lighting is a particularly easy way to dip into the industrial look.

From traditional school lights to factory and ship’s lights, 19th-century lighting has a simple, refined elegance that is stripped back, simple and unpretentious. There’s a reason these designs have lasted.”

While lighting may be a good place to start, there are plenty of other ways to bring an industrial look into the average home.

Mark Holloway of classic and contemporary fixtures and fittings site Holloways of Ludlow suggests incorporating hand-polished, cast-iron radiators to provide “an impressive, steely backdrop” or adding little details such as jelly mould light switches.

Contemporary slate wall tiles are another good option, says Sheila Elliott, creative director at British Ceramic Tile. “Ledgestone offers a very modern take on natural stone and can instantly update a kitchen in need of some urban influence,” she explains. “The tiles themselves have a rugged, textured feel and have been designed to mimic the effect of a real brick wall with the contours of the tiles jutting in and out for a dramatic, edgy effect.”

Copy of cw Decor_0270

A clamp lamp by Thinking. Picture: Candice Chaplin

INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERS

Meanwhile, there’s a lot of fun to be had browsing second-hand shops, vintage markets, car boot sales and online stores, such as eBay or Etsy, where scratched metal tables from industrial kitchens, scrubbed wooden tables from dairies or old lift-up-lid school desks can be turned into kitchen tables; retro seating, salvaged from factory canteens or school rooms, transformed into dining chairs; or galvanised steel trolleys used as coffee tables.

“Full of provenance and an honest approach to design” these type of products “have broad appeal and work in homes that are happy to embrace a mix of styles”, says Philippa Prinsloo, senior designer at John Lewis Home.

“Just beware when using these pieces in non-industrial properties that the look may need to be softened with colour and styled with solid wood pieces and textile accessories.”

Otherwise, it’s a trend to be embraced and enjoyed by all – even if you don’t own an edgy warehouse.– The Independent

Get our free Lifestyle newsletter - subscribe here...


sign up
 
 

Comment Guidelines



  1. Please read our comment guidelines.
  2. Login and register, if you haven’ t already.
  3. Write your comment in the block below and click (Post As)
  4. Has a comment offended you? Hover your mouse over the comment and wait until a small triangle appears on the right-hand side. Click triangle () and select "Flag as inappropriate". Our moderators will take action if need be.

     

Business Directory