Durban - Thomas Oosthuizen and Henk Swanepoel renovated an old Spanish-style house into a modern, clean-lined, open space, bathed in natural light and maximising the Ballito view.

The house is overflowing with beautiful old furniture, quirky contemporary art, blown glass and high-end crockery, like Rosenthal, that the owners have a penchant for.

In the entrance a Murano chandelier, yellow tulips on an antique table and at least three pieces of artwork – among them a picture made from laser-cut Lotto paper, called Fragility, by Lyndi Sales and another artwork by Walter Altmann – signal “collectors”.

The downstairs living room area which includes a TV room, dining room, lounge and kitchen opens on to a patio and pool.

In the lounge is sign language in a light box, that ironically you have to see to understand.

There are beautiful, unique pieces everywhere.

Artwork even finds it’s way into the kitchen – here in the form of a light box and the famed Stuart Bird Zuma biscuits.

There are many pieces by William Kentridge and Andy Warhol.

It’s easy for the conversation to veer away from décor and into the realm of art.

However, “pretty pieces” have formed the basis of many a home and Oosthuizen, says it’s the desire to surround yourself with what you love. In this case stimulating, thought-provoking objects.

The bedrooms in the house are all cheerful spaces – the idea is that you need to get up, feeling like getting up.

The library is a treasure trove.

“Your house is your own,” says Oosthuizen. “We’re against decorating, but all for personality.

“It’s nice if others like it, but you don’t create it for them. It’s for your pleasure.”

Omeshnie Naidoo, The Mercury