Roadblocks will be increased, as will blitz alcohol testing, and provincial traffic police will embark on a change speed operation. File photo: Matthew Jordaan
Cape Town - It will be all hands on deck for traffic officers in the province as they prepare for high traffic volumes ahead of the Easter weekend.

Western Cape traffic chief Kenny Afrika said no officers would be on leave.

“It will be a full house, officers will be working around the clock," he said. "We are expecting heavy traffic from Thursday into Friday morning. Areas which will be overflowing with traffic will be Sir Lowry’s Pass heading towards Caledon, the N1 heading north, and the West Coast’s R27.

“Then on Monday it will be bumper to bumper from Swellendam and Ashton to Worcester. It is going to be a very busy weekend.”

Afrika said public transport such as buses and taxis would be checked for roadworthiness and issued with colour-coded stickers for approval.

“Taxis and buses will be checked at Joe Gqabi Long Distance Bus Terminus and the main taxi rank. If a vehicle is found to be roadworthy, a sticker will be put on the windscreen so that traffic officers on the road can see it has been checked. Vehicles that are faulty will be impounded immediately and will not operate,” he said.

The main pit stops for checks would be the Joe Gqabi terminus, the Huguenot Tunnel and the Joostenbergvlakte bridge.

Mayoral committee member for safety and security JP Smith said Metro Police were also going to work around the clock in the city.

“Over the Easter weekend we bring in a lot of staff on overtime and bolster them with overtime pay to have more of a presence on the road and in recreation areas," he said.

Operation Exodus 

“Long distance buses and taxis contribute significantly to road deaths, so we have implemented Operation Exodus to check their roadworthiness before they depart.”

Roadblocks will be increased, as will blitz alcohol testing, and provincial traffic police will embark on a change speed operation.

Afrika said this year the province, together with the national department, aimed to decrease last year’s national death toll by at least 50 percent.

in 2016 the national Easter weekend death toll dropped 46 percent from 287 to 156. The recorded death toll in the Western Cape was 21, two less than the 2015 Easter weekend.

The Automobile Association urged motorists to drive cautiously.

“Too often drivers think bad situations won’t happen to them - but it takes only one reckless driver to cause mayhem.”

Cape Argus

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