Start making sense of your financial wellness.

Watch the Sitholes every Thursday at 17h30 on e.tv

Improved drugs only cure for TB

Comment on this story


iol scitech jan 18 tb india

Cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis will continue to increase unless scientists develop more effective medicines with fewer side effects.

This has emerged as one of the key issues at the third South African tuberculosis conference, which opened on Wednesday night in Durban.

At present, people with drug-resistant TB face almost two years’ of treatment, including a daily injection for the first six months.

Despite this punishing regimen, less than half the cases of drug-resistant TB were cured in SA last year, according to the World Health Organisation.

“Treatment for drug-resistant TB is ineffective. It is too long, there are significant side effects and it is expensive,” according to Dr Helen Cox of Medicins sans Frontieres.

“Aside from the daily injections that are very painful, 30 percent of people with drug-resistant TB develop hearing loss that is irreversible as a side effect of the drugs,” said Cox.

cd front tb test

File photo: Samples are seen at a clinic testing for tuberculosis in the township of Khayelitsha, on the outskirts of Cape Town.

AP

“If someone starts going deaf a few weeks into treatment, what do we do? They need to continue with their treatment, but this means they will either be deaf or dead. This highlights the urgent need for new drugs.”

The Treatment Action Campaign, Section 27 and Oxfam, called for patients with drug-resistant TB who were failing to respond to treatment to be given “access to the best available medicines”.

The organisations argued for such patients to get compassionate access to new, promising medicines not yet approved by the Medicines Control Council, including Linezolid, Beda-quiline and Delaminid.

The organisations delivered a memorandum containing the list of demands to the conference organisers shortly before the opening.

These include the diagnosis of all people living with TB and the decentralisation of care for those with drug-resistant TB, enabling them to be treated at home instead of hospitalised for long periods.

Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi was due to open the conference, but had to withdraw at the last minute to attend to “urgent business”, possibly linked to the cabinet reshuffle.

Dr Ausi Nkhi told the 1 700 delegates how she had contracted TB of the uterus as a medical student.

As a result, she had been unable to fall pregnant and had endured four ectopic pregnancies.

Nkhi warned that healthworkers faced significantly more risk of getting TB than the general population.

“I am living with the aftermath of TB, and I wish that no one should go through suffering and death as a result of this disease,” Nkhi said. – Health-e News Service.


sign up
 
 

Comment Guidelines



  1. Please read our comment guidelines.
  2. Login and register, if you haven’ t already.
  3. Write your comment in the block below and click (Post As)
  4. Has a comment offended you? Hover your mouse over the comment and wait until a small triangle appears on the right-hand side. Click triangle () and select "Flag as inappropriate". Our moderators will take action if need be.

     

Join us on

IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks

Business Directory