Start making sense of your financial wellness.

Watch the Sitholes every Thursday at 17h30 on e.tv

Cyclone halts air search for MH370

Comment on this story


IOL pic apr14 malaysia plane search binoculars

Reuters

Gunner Richard Brown (left) of Transit Security Element looks through binoculars as he stands on lookout with other crew members aboard the Australian Navy ship HMAS Perth as they continue to search for signs of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. Picture: Australian Defence Force, via Reuters

Perth - A tropical cyclone heading south over the Indian Ocean caused the air search for a missing Malaysian jetliner to be suspended on Tuesday, as a US submarine drone neared completion of its undersea search without any sign of wreckage.

The daily air and sea sorties have continued for a week since Australian authorities said they would end that component of the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which disappeared on March 8 with 239 people on board.

But on Tuesday, hours after authorities said up to 10 military aircraft and 10 ships would join the day's search, they said the air search had been suspended because of poor weather as a result of Tropical Cyclone Jack.

“It has been determined that the current weather conditions are resulting in heavy seas and poor visibility, and would make any air search activities ineffective and potentially hazardous,” the Joint Agency Co-ordination Centre said in a statement.

The ships involved in the day's search about 1 600km north-west of the Australian city of Perth would continue with their planned activities, the centre added.

The setback occurred as the $4-million US Navy submarine Bluefin-21 was scheduled to complete its mission as soon as Wednesday with the search officials confirming the device is yet to find any sign of wreckage.

The authorities have turned up no conclusive evidence of the aircraft's ultimate location but believe sonar signals, or “pings”, detected in the Indian Ocean search area several weeks ago may have emanated from the plane's “black box” recorder.

But after more than a week of daily sweeps of the largely unmapped stretch of ocean floor 4.5km deep and 2 000km north-west of the Australian city of Perth, the drone is yet to produce any sign of wreckage, officials said on Tuesday.

On April 18, the Perth-based Joint Agency Co-ordination Centre told Reuters that the Bluefin's search of the target area, a circle with a 10km radius, would likely end in as little as five days.

As the remote controlled submarine was expected to complete its ninth mission on Tuesday, four days after the co-ordination centre gave the five-day timeframe, the centre confirmed that it had covered about two thirds of its target search area and had found “no contacts of interest”.

The dawning prospect of the Bluefin-21, initially seen as the search's most promising aid, completing its mission without a trace of the missing aircraft has authorities under pressure to determine which strategy to take next.

The daily search involving some two dozen nations is already shaping up to be the most expensive in aviation history. - Reuters


sign up
 
 

Comment Guidelines



  1. Please read our comment guidelines.
  2. Login and register, if you haven’ t already.
  3. Write your comment in the block below and click (Post As)
  4. Has a comment offended you? Hover your mouse over the comment and wait until a small triangle appears on the right-hand side. Click triangle () and select "Flag as inappropriate". Our moderators will take action if need be.

     

Join us on

IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks IOL-Social networks

Business Directory