Facebook tests ‘want’ button

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Associated Press

The social networking firm is testing a feature that lets people create 'wishlists' of home furnishings, clothing and other items, as part of what could become a move into e-commerce.

London - The Facebook “like” has become the easiest way to show our approval of what our friend ate for lunch or the fluffiness of their pet cat.

Now, a new “want” button will allow users to announce their desire for a new wardrobe or expensive lingerie at the click of a button.

The social networking firm is testing a feature that lets people create “wishlists” of home furnishings, clothing and other items, as part of what could become a move into e-commerce.

Facebook is currently working with seven US retailers, including Pottery Barn and Victoria’s Secret, and will encourage users to buy products through the site or send them directly to the online stores.

The “Collections” feature is also being tried out with Neiman Marcus, Michael Kors, Smith Optics, Wayfair and Fab.com.

Soon all US users will begin seeing messages and images from retailers suggesting they flag products using either a “want” or a “collect” button.

Products you have clicked on will then appear in your Timeline – which is not how the current “like” button works.

Facebook said in a statement: “People will be able to engage with these collections and share things they are interested in with their friends. People can click through and buy these items off Facebook.”

A spokeswoman said the company will not receive a fee when someone purchases a Facebook wishlist item from a retailer’s site.

Robert W Baird analyst Colin Sebastian said the new Collections feature could open up new sources of revenue for Facebook, whose stock has taken a drubbing as concerns about its long-term money-making prospects have mounted.

“E-commerce is one of the best ways to monetise the internet,” he said. “Thinking about how large they are as a platform and how engaged people are, there are lots of levers they haven’t pulled yet in terms of monetisation.”

Retailers might also pay Facebook to promote products featured on users’ wishlists, Sebastian suggested, in a similar technique used in the current ads function. – Daily Mail

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