Cape Town - The exploration of the World Heritage site, commonly known as “Die Hel”, Gamkaskloof reveals a hidden valley, tucked away deep in the Swartberg Nature reserve.

A secluded paradise that requires investigation by all as part of South Africa’s Best Roads To Drive campaign.

With its several dips and curves, a 4x4 is recommended to discovery of the rocky 57km road to Die Hel. With many of the original farm cottages now offering rustic accommodation far from the madding crowd in the city, the opportunity to take in paradise can be realised.

Surrounded by the mountain vistas, rock formations and the clear mountain air, families and friends can take the time to explore the area through a hike, mountain bike or a swim. Also a very popular camping area, the valley floor offers dense riverine shrubs, roses and proteas while the fynbos reveal themselves at higher altitudes. It is no surprise that a small community of farmers made the Gamkaskloof their home as it caters for all ages providing the ideal holiday destination.

 

 

A photo posted by Elize (@adventures_of_one) on

 

The charming hamlet of Prince Albert that is half a day away, offers art galleries, restaurants – and even an art deco bioscope for the more artistic travellers.

Travelling south over the magnificent Swartberg Pass, and Oudtshoorn’s Cango Caves and finally the Garden Route, Gamkaskloof is begging to be explored.

Gamkaskloof can also be reached from Oudtshoorn by following the Cango Caves road. Extending into the distance, Gamkaskloof road drops through a series of hairpin bends to the valley floor 1000 meters below.

 

 

A photo posted by Andrew Bance (@andrewbance) on

 

Be courteous on the road and give ascending vehicles right of way on the tighter areas. Engage low gear and let the gearbox slow you down on the descent.

Adapted from a press release for IOL

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