Four airlines operating in South Africa were forced to delay flights and ground some planes after inspections were carried out overnight. File Photo: IOL
Four airlines operating in South Africa were forced to delay flights and ground some planes after inspections were carried out overnight. File Photo: IOL
Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) said that they are aware of the notification by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to Comair and SAA that certain of their aircraft may not be flown until issues identified by the authority have been resolved.
Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) said that they are aware of the notification by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to Comair and SAA that certain of their aircraft may not be flown until issues identified by the authority have been resolved.
JOHANNESBURG - Four airlines operating in South Africa were forced to delay flights and ground some planes after inspections were carried out overnight.

State-owned South African Airways and Mango were affected as was Comair Ltd., which operates Kulula and British Airways domestically, according to statements. It’s not routine for airlines in South Africa to suffer simultaneous groundings, but it’s not yet clear whether passenger safety has been at risk or what the technical issues involve.

South African Airways said it will operate an amended flight schedule Tuesday for compliance checks in line with South African Civil Aviation Authority requirements. The decision followed an oversight inspection conducted by the authority at South African Airways Technical, which oversees the maintenance for a number of carriers, according to the airline.

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) said that they are aware of the notification by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to Comair and SAA that certain of their aircraft may not be flown until issues identified by the authority have been resolved.

ACSA said in a statement, " We are working with the affected airlines to understand their respective contingency plans and what the potential impact of the SACAA directive on airport operations.  Airports Company South Africa will provide further information as soon as it is available to us. In the meantime, affected passengers should remain in contact with their respective airlines."

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) said that they are aware of the notification by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to Comair and SAA that certain of their aircraft may not be flown until issues identified by the authority have been resolved.

BUSINESS REPORT ONLINE / BLOOMBERG