The 2020 Veritas Databerg report has uncovered the data trends and issues lurking below the surface in South African businesses, comparing this year and 2019. 
Photo: Bethany Drouin/Pixabay
The 2020 Veritas Databerg report has uncovered the data trends and issues lurking below the surface in South African businesses, comparing this year and 2019. Photo: Bethany Drouin/Pixabay

Reducing the cost of backup/recovery is the main driver of cloud adoption - report

By Dhivana Rajgopaul Time of article published Mar 24, 2020

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DURBAN - The 2020 Veritas Databerg report has uncovered the data trends and issues lurking below the surface in South African businesses, comparing this year and 2019.

The ‘Databerg’ is similar to an iceberg, where the majority of mass hides below the waterline, unseen to the naked eye. A ‘Databerg’ is the bulk of an organisation's data sits below the surface. It comprises of clean data, Redundant, Obsolete and Trivial (ROT) data, as well as dark data, which is made up of both clean and ROT data. 

The report shows: 

1. The ROT is setting in for South Africa — ROT data has risen by 9 percent across all sectors

2. Organisations expect to store over half, 51 percent, of their data in the cloud by 2021

3. Reducing the cost of backup/recovery is the top factor driving the adoption of cloud services for 61 percent of businesses

4. The C-suite is misinformed about organisations' disaster recovery reality

5. South Africa is failing to reap the rewards of automation

Below is a closer look at four of the five points.

The ROT is setting in for South Africa — ROT data has risen by 9 percent across all sectors

South African organisations have lost control of the Databerg according to the report. Redundant, Obsolete and Trivial data stored across South African organisations has risen by 9 percent from 31 percent to 40 percent.

Last year, 59 percent of stored data was classified or tagged, this has dropped by 8 percent to 51 percent.

The current economic climate in South Africa has led IT leaders to deprioritise data management it seems. The Public Sector seems to have felt the biggest impact. Since last year classified or tagged data in the Public Sector has fallen dramatically by 16 percent, while ROT data has increased by 21 percent. 

Nearly half, 49 percent, of all data stored is now Redundant, Obsolete or Trivial. ROT has not, thankfully, set in for all sectors — Utility firms have reduced ROT by 12 percent since last year, falling from 44 percent of data in 2019 to less than a third, 32 percent, in 2020. Classified or tagged data has also decreased slightly by 2 percent within Utilities from 59 percent last year to 61 percent this year.

Reducing costs tops cloud adoption priorities 

Cloud has multiple benefits, but the bottom line is top of mind in South Africa. Reducing the cost of backup/recovery is the main driver of cloud adoption at 61 percent, followed by reducing storage costs and reducing overall IT costs, taking joint second place at 55 percent.

Expenditure continues to dominate priorities for cloud projects, as reducing disaster recovery services costs is cited by 54 percent of businesses and reducing the cost of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is prioritised by 46 percent.

When it comes to the titles behind cloud decisions, Operations Directors are keenest on cloud delivering cost savings for backup and recovery, with 75 percent selecting it as a priority. On the other hand, T Managers, CIOs, COOs and Heads of Department all prioritise reducing storage costs over streamlining backup and recovery.

The C-suite is misinformed about organisations' disaster recovery reality

In South Africa, rising cloud costs, safety concerns and an increase in cyber attacks are forcing IT leaders to assess their levels of preparedness. 

Just 44 percent of South African organisations believe they have a backup and recovery plan that can resolve attacks in the same week, while 32 percent claim to have a backup and recovery plan and can resolve attacks in the following few days. Only 2 percent of organisations in South Africa believe they can resolve an attack within a couple of hours.

Within companies, IT Directors and Heads of Department are most realistic about their organisation’s backup and recovery plans in the event of a ransomware attack. 

Those in hands-on roles predict they have a backup and recovery plan which can resolve attacks in the same week — Heads of Department are the most cautious with 60 percent claiming to resolve within the same week, IT Directors follow suit with 52 percent believing they can recover in the same week.

South Africa is failing to reap the rewards of automation

When it comes to reporting backup, storage and virtual infrastructures, automation has improved the process for the majority, but manual methods are still taking up too much precious time. The highest proportion of South African organisations surveyed, 41 percent, centrally manage and automatically consolidate reporting. 

However, a quarter, 25 percent, still rely on manual processes, consolidating from different systems periodically to a central report. Despite the volume of data needing to be stored and the ubiquity of repetitive processes, the majority of Finance firms, 45 percent, still use manual processes. 

Alarmingly, 10 percent of Industry and 5 percent of Public Sector organisations take a distributed management approach with no central reporting capabilities, manual or otherwise. While this deviates from best practice, this could be the potential result of reduction in government funding impacting business processes. The Utilities Sector takes the lead with 65 percent of organisations using automation to centrally manage and consolidate to a central report.

BUSINESS REPORT ONLINE

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