UASA said the government was putting the country’s citizens first and would not spare any expense to assist where it could. Photo: Supplied
UASA said the government was putting the country’s citizens first and would not spare any expense to assist where it could. Photo: Supplied

UASA applauds efforts to cover salaries that may not be paid during Covid-19

By Sizwe Dlamini Time of article published Apr 23, 2020

Share this article:

CAPE TOWN – UASA said on Wednesday that it was especially pleased that efforts were being made to cover salaries that may not be paid and to protect and create jobs in these difficult times.

President Cyril Ramaphosa on Tuesday announced a R500 billion economic and social relief package to give the South African economy a boost in the wake of the impact from the Covid-19 global pandemic.

Ramaphosa said that R100 billion would be used to protect and create new jobs while another R40 billion would be used for income support for employees whose employers are unable to pay wages.

Stanford Mazhindu, the spokesperson of the trade union formerly called the United Association of South Africa, said the economic and social relief package made available by the government to beat the effects of the coronavirus would be of significant help to South Africans in need during the nation’s battle against Covid-19. 

He said it showed that government was putting the country’s citizens first and would not spare any expense to assist where it could.

“We also welcome the grant increase to child beneficiaries who will receive an extra R300 during May and then an extra R500 for five months thereafter as well as the R250 all other grant beneficiaries will receive over the next three months and the R350 for six months for all unemployed people who are not collecting UIF or another grant.

“We hope that these plans will be executed swiftly and smoothly to the benefit of our people,” said Mazhindu.

UASA said it was looking forward to more information on the incremental lifting of the lockdown to restart the economy.

BUSINESS REPORT

Share this article:

Related Articles