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How hardships of South Africa cage the entrepreneurial spirit of some

Richard Dube, who works a 9-5 job and reinforces his monthly income, working himself to the bone, with a side hustle.

Richard Dube, who works a 9-5 job and reinforces his monthly income, working himself to the bone, with a side hustle.

Published Jul 21, 2022

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While the government encourages South Africans to focus on entrepreneurship year in, year out, the disconnect may be evident as the struggles of everyday life for many wanting to venture into starting their own business bite hard.

This is the case for Richard Dube, who works a 9-5 job and reinforces his monthly income, working himself to the bone, with a side hustle at an events company, where he handles sound equipment.

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Dube says: “I shadowed a sound engineer and gained the skills to work the equipment just so I could supplement my income as I have a family to support. Living in South Africa is hard, and people must hustle just to make ends meet.”

Dube’s sentiments ring true for many South Africans, as they contend with increasing fuel prices, another interest hike looming later this week as well as the conflict between Russia and Ukraine spurring on food prices.

Dube’s day job, delivering lighting equipment to mines and other clients of the company he works for, sees him driving many kilometres daily, and once his day is done, he usually begins working his second job, handling sound requirements for certain events in Johannesburg.

He told Business Report that he dreams of one day starting his own business.

He said: “I would love to start my own business one day. I studied marketing, and I have the skills to start my own events company, but I am not willing to take the risk just yet, because if I leave my job, which is the bread and butter for my family, what will happen to them, as I support them financially.

“Equipment is expensive, obtaining contacts to ensure a business is up and running is also challenging, but it is something I am willing to work towards. One day I will hopefully have my own business and the economic climate of the country, will allow me to start my own business,” Dube further said.

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