FILE PHOTO: Visitors walk past an advertising billboard for Fitbit Ionic watches at the IFA Electronics Show in Berlin
INTERNATIONAL - Fitbit Inc (FIT.N) is developing a method to detect irregular heart rhythm in time through a partnership with Bristol-Myers Squibb-Pfizer Alliance, as the wearable device maker looks to match a feature available on rival Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) Watch.

Fitbit has been pushing deeper into the healthcare space and in August tied up with the Singapore government to provide fitness trackers and services in a health program that the company said could reach up to one million users. 

Under Thursday’s deal, the company’s devices will carry software that will help detect atrial fibrillation - the most common type of irregular heartbeat - after approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

A man shows the new model of Apple Watch during the opening of Mexico's first flagship Apple store at Antara shopping mall in Mexico City. Fitbit Inc (FIT.N) is developing a method to detect irregular heart rhythm in time through a partnership with Bristol-Myers Squibb-Pfizer Alliance, as the wearable device maker looks to match a feature available on rival Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) Watch.
Atrial fibrillation is a condition associated with irregular heart rhythm that increases the risk of stroke and is usually prevalent among people above 65 years of age.

About 2.7 million to 6 million people suffer from the condition in the United States, according to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention.

A visitor uses a Fitbit Ionic watch at an IFA Electronics Show. Fitbit Inc (FIT.N) is developing a method to detect irregular heart rhythm in time through a partnership with Bristol-Myers Squibb-Pfizer Alliance, as the wearable device maker looks to match a feature available on rival Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) Watch. Reuters African News Agency (ANA)
REUTERS