Picture: Superspar in Bela Bela, Limpopo that burnt down on September 23, 2017. (Facebook).
Picture: Superspar in Bela Bela, Limpopo that burnt down on September 23, 2017. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).
Picture: Bela Bela Superspar employees engaging in community work. (Facebook).

CAPE TOWN - A local Spar in Limpopo burnt down in September this year, leaving 148 workers facing unemployment. 

The owner then decided to keep his workers employed, finding alternative work for them to do. 

On September 23, 2017, the Superspar in Bela Bela, Limpopo, burnt down in a tragic fire. 

The owner then faced a loss of business and the grave warning of 148 jobs being threatened. Some of the employees have worked at the store for more than 17 years. 

Instead of letting them fall into unemployment, the owner embarked on a drive to find alternative work for his workers. 

The I AM SPAR project was then born. The project, employed workers by having them engage in charity projects around the city while the store was being rebuilt. 

According to Superspar Bela Bela, the project divided the staff into teams and they are currently working at the old age home, schools, hospitals and even at the local police station. 

 

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Since beginning the project, the staff members have collectively done more than 30 000 man hours of community service. 

From painting schools to building churches and cultivated vegetable gardens for the poorer communities and even refurbished the hospital. 

The decision to pay the staff while doing charity work has also inspired the community.

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- BUSINESS REPORT ONLINE