(171012) -- UNITED NATIONS, Oct. 12, 2017 (Xinhua) -- A man interviews Sophia (L), a life-like humanoid robot, at the UN headquarters in New York, Oct. 11, 2017. Sophia was here attending a meeting on "The Future of Everything - Sustainable Development in the Age of Rapid Technological Change". (Xinhua/Li Muzi) (zy)
INTERNATIONAL - Hi, this is Pavel in Japan. First, the good news: robots are finally coming. The bad news: they won’t be the sexy humanoids imagined by anime creators.

That was the message from Eugene Izhikevich, founder and chief executive of Brain Corporation, who was in Tokyo last week to speak at SoftBank’s annual robot conference about one of his creations - a 400kg autonomous floor cleaner.

The machine, which looks like a cross between a Zamboni and a motorised wheel chair, was originally designed to be operated by a human. Equipped with Brain’s software and an array of sensors typically found in a self-driving car, it mops floors on its own even when customers are around.

“Anything you see that has wheels, we can turn into a robot,” Izhikevich, a neuroscientist, said in an interview, speaking with a trace of a Russian accent.

“Wouldn’t it be nice to have 100 different robots three, five years from now?”

(171012) -- UNITED NATIONS, Oct. 12, 2017 (Xinhua) -- Sophia, a life-like humanoid robot, is pictured at the UN headquarters in New York, Oct. 11, 2017. Sophia was here attending a meeting on "The Future of Everything - Sustainable Development in the Age of Rapid Technological Change". (Xinhua/Li Muzi) (zy)

Though the industrial robot population has risen to 1.8million since GM first put one on an assembly line in 1961, growth has been limited, because most are variations on the original theme: a big claw on a metal limb.

Attempts to use humanoid machines as companions and assistants have also fallen flat. Brain has found a way to get the machines out of their metal cages by finding niche business applications for recent advances in machine vision.

Brain’s robots already clean floors at Wal-Mart, Costco, Lowe’s and multiple airports in the US.

(171012) -- UNITED NATIONS, Oct. 12, 2017 (Xinhua) -- Sophia, a life-like humanoid robot, is pictured at the UN headquarters in New York, Oct. 11, 2017. Sophia was here attending a meeting on "The Future of Everything - Sustainable Development in the Age of Rapid Technological Change". (Xinhua/Li Muzi) (zy)

Brain is focusing on indoor applications of autonomous driving technology because stores and warehouses offer more predictable environments. Unlike driverless cars, when stumped, the robots can always stop and query a more powerful AI in the cloud or even a human operator. 

- BLOOMBERG