FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 20, 2019 file photo, Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg attends an interview with the Associated Press before the Climate Strike, at City Hall, in New York. When climate activist Greta Thunberg, also 16, was named Time magazine's 2019 person of the year, President Donald Trump took to Twitter to call her choice “ridiculous." (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez, File)
INTERNATIONAL - It’s easy to scorn billionaires when they warn about global warming from their world of private jets and luxury yachts.

That’s not deterring some of the most powerful people from focusing on climate change at their annual gathering in the Swiss resort of Davos next week.

There’s always a risk the World Economic Forum’s focus could backfire by strengthening the idea that rising temperatures are something only elites can afford to care about. And despite progress on electric cars and clean energy, the planet is getting hotter.

But, as Peter Coy writes, don’t underestimate the power of talk.

Sipping champagne with their peers in the shadow of melting glaciers may attract public disdain, yet it can galvanize a sense of urgency among the titans of industry, presidents and prime ministers, big-name thinkers and other Davos delegates.
Fridays For Future climate march in Lausanne. here’s always a risk the World Economic Forum’s focus could backfire by strengthening the idea that rising temperatures are something only elites can afford to care about. And despite progress on electric cars and clean energy, the planet is getting hotter.
As images of the devastating wildfires in Australia capture the world’s attention, this year may finally see a shift in thinking about climate change among those who have the power to do something about it.

Whatever else, the Davos crowd can bank on a very public climate shaming from one of their number: A certain Greta Thunberg is on this year’s guest list.

As images of the devastating wildfires in Australia capture the world’s attention, this year may finally see a shift in thinking about climate change among those who have the power to do something about it. Image: Fridays For Future climate march in Lausanne.

BLOOMBERG