Through a collaborative effort, the Atlantic Seaboard and Gugulethu Community Action Networks (CAN) with NGOs held its second market in aid of the homeless. Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Through a collaborative effort, the Atlantic Seaboard and Gugulethu Community Action Networks (CAN) with NGOs held its second market in aid of the homeless. Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)

Market place with a humanitarian twist takes place in Sea Point

By Shakirah Thebus Time of article published Dec 14, 2020

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Cape Town - Through a collaborative effort, the Atlantic Seaboard and Gugulethu Community Action Networks (CAN) with NGOs held its second market in aid of the homeless.

The Gugulethu-Seaboard CAN, Ladles of Love, Souper Troopers, Mini Meltdown are raising funds through the mini market with around 15 stalls selling goods ranging from fresh produce, knitted toys, cupcakes, pre-loved books, apparel at Milton Road.

Ladles of Love General Manager Taryn Thomas, said Ladles of Love distributes fresh produce to around 110 soup kitchens across the Western Cape weekly, with some feeding around 200-300 people a day.

Their presence at the market was to create awareness of the work done and all proceeds made at the market will go towards continuing to provide food relief to those in need.

Gugulethu CAN founder Pamela Siluana said proceeds from the market goes to community kitchens, responding to fire victims, educational needs, and to pregnant women who can't afford needed items among others.

“We respond to everything that Covid-19 affects in the township,” Siluana said.

Sea Point resident Peter Wagenaar made headlines in May after his Mini Cooper was torched in Beach Road, Mouille Point.

The torching of his vehicle is believed to be due to receiving some pushback from a few residents on his feeding of homeless people during the lockdown. The Mini Meltdown, born out of this, is trying to raise funds through the sale of various apparel items with an image of the car - now a symbol of hope.

“Once things settle down in terms of Covid-19, we want to go into schools and teach the kids about conflict resolution and not resorting to violence when you don't get your own way in life,” he said.

Wagenaar said funds raised through the items on sale will go towards hiring an assistant for Souper Troopers’ social auxiliary worker.

Social auxiliary worker Tasneem Fielies assists around 103 homeless people each month to provide holistic rehabilitation.

“I started doing counselling sessions with the clients, finding out what their problems were, making IDs, finding a way to restore their dignity back by doing workshops and job readiness programs, getting them into some shelter spaces and assisting them holistically with not only one issue ,but we work from the bottom up, we make the person whole again. This is basically what I do on a daily basis.”

After rehabilitation takes place, Souper Troopers continues to provide support, making her working hours unconventional, hence the need for extra assistance.

Cape Argus

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