Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency (ANA)
Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency (ANA)

PHOTO ESSAY: Mother City gets infected by all things arty as performance fest returns

By Staff reporter Time of article published Nov 20, 2019

Share this article:

Cape Town - The exciting Infecting The City festival (ICT) is back for its 11th edition with free-pass artistic performances all over Cape Town this week.

The festival, which was started in 2008 by Jay Pather and Brett Bailey, didn't happen last year for funding reasons.

This year the festival received support from UCT, the Mellon Foundation and the African Centre.

“Public art is neither recent nor new, certainly not for the African continent,” said ICT curator Pather. “It follows, therefore, that the idea of a public art festival has deep resonance for us on this continent.”

The public arts festival includes South African and African artists as well as diverse international artists from the Netherlands, France and Switzerland. Its aim is to involve the city and the people in their collectively-owned public spaces through artworks and performances.

BY: MOVING STORIES THEATRE ORGANISATION. In the process of becoming we break, lose, walk, trip, attempt to fly, fall, hang on to hope, lose passion and regain it. Life is about the process more than the product. This procession happens between four performers. Two of the performers begin by cleansing the space because, as people, when we encounter spaces we allow our bodies to first familiarise themselves. Ink is used as a symbol of the stories we carry, and white fabric as a canvas (our bodies) to engrave the stories. With each phase, there is a need to reconnect with the self and cleanse. Cast: Luvuyo Gishi, Nomakrestu Xakathugaga, Thembekile Komani and Zandile Zihlangu. Video: David Ritchie/African News Agency

Under the Whale Well, at the South African Museum of Natural History, composer and pianist Nduduzo Makhatini and dancer Kitty Phetla headlined the opening of the festival with their performance Going Back to the Truth of Space on Monday.

ITC19 consists of six programmes, three during the day and three in the evenings, routing through the cityscape. The audience will be lead during each route from one artwork to the next, although there’s also a self-guided programme. There will also be eight performances in different spaces from Thibault Square to Wale Street, all the way through St George’s Mall.

See: http://infectingthecity.com/2019/

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is !Orola by the Dancers: Charmonay Anthony, Lewellyn Africa, Nichelle Linnert, Tamsyn Spannenberg Choreography: Elvis Sibeko. This performance takes place at Krotoa Place in St Georges Mall. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is Ingxoxo Yabafazi (Stories of women) by the Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership Academy. This work challenges the perception of women as weak and considers women as who they are, enduring and courageous, at the forefront of our society, who manage to support their families even in dire and painful circumstances. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Included in this years diverse programme are top South African and African artists from Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, Eastern Cape, Zimbabwe and Namibia, who will be joined by international acts from the Netherlands, France and Switzerland. From vertical dancers on city walls to performance activity in parked cars, ITC 2019 will activate city spaces from the Castle to the station, the fountain to the Cathedral and beyond. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Pictured is an offshoot of the Abengcongolo Collectives theatrical production entitled Nguvu Ya Mbegu, The Cleansing attempts to invite the ghosts of the 1921 Bulhoek massacre to unearth the traumas of the past. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

The aesthetic of this visceral, sensorial and transformative production draws on African traditions of storytelling dance, song, music, and ensemble work. The voices of Abantwana Bomgquba (children of the earth) whisper into the ears of the present and future child, a reminder that they have never been alone. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

The voices of Abantwana Bomgquba (children of the earth) whisper into the ears of the present and future child, a reminder that they have never been alone. A reminder that it takes the weeds to grow the strength of a seed, regardless of the pain, and historical, racial and colonial injustices. Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency(ANA)

Cape Argus

Share this article:

Related Articles