The process of converting the Ankerlig Power Station from diesel to liquefied natural gas is on track and set to come online in September 2024. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
The process of converting the Ankerlig Power Station from diesel to liquefied natural gas is on track and set to come online in September 2024. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

Ankerlig power plant’s conversion to liquefied natural gas on track, says Eskom

By Mwangi Githathu Time of article published Oct 20, 2020

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Cape Town - The process of converting the Ankerlig Power Station from diesel to liquefied natural gas (LNG), which represents a potential cost saving of R270 billion over the 2024-2050 period, is on track and set to come online in September 2024, according to Eskom.

Eskom officials told visiting members of the standing committee on finance, economic opportunity that the figures are contained in the feasibility study for the province’s integrated LNG importation and gas-to-power project.

Committee chairperson Deidré Baartman (DA) said: “Eskom has put out two requests for information (RFIs) for the balance of the project infrastructure as well as sourcing gas, with 13 proposals received to-date.”

“Ankerlig is aiming to conclude their gas contracting strategy by the end of October 2020, the investment proposal by November 2020, and receive the approval of the Department of Public Enterprise regarding their gas supply agreement by September 2021.

“Should these goals be met, then construction will commence in July 2022,” said Baartman.

“The conversion of the Ankerlig Power Station is an important step in the Western Cape’s plan for sustainable energy generation and ensuring energy security in the province.”

“LNG has the potential to save billions of rands with a reduction in carbon dioxide emission of up to 907 000 tons a year and the saving of 1.8 billion litres of water annually.

“It is the most cost-effective and greener way for the power station to meet the demand for energy in the Western Cape.”

Committee member Nosipho Makamba-Botya (EFF) said: “The advantages of converting a power station from using diesel to liquefied natural gas will only be cost effective if the power station readily caters for such a swift shift.”

“Another issue will be whether the gas is readily available in the area and whether the requisite infrastructure is already in place, such as gas pipelines etc.,” said Makamba-Botya

The committee also visited the Atlantis special economic zone (ASEZ) to assess the progress that the project has made since inception in 2018.

The visit came a day after a similar visit by Premier Alan Winde and Finance and Economic Opportunities MEC David Maynier.

Cape Argus

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