Pictures from a previous exhibition of the life of Dulcie September at New life Science Building UWC Picture Ayanda Ndamane
Pictures from a previous exhibition of the life of Dulcie September at New life Science Building UWC Picture Ayanda Ndamane

Anti-apartheid heroine Dulcie September remembered

By Mwangi Githahu Time of article published Mar 30, 2021

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Cape Town - The fact that the actual killer or killers of anti-apartheid ANC political activist Dulcie September are still not known 33 years later was one of the issues that arose during a memorial webinar held on Monday.

Most of the speculation about September’s assassination points to the apartheid regime, as at the time of her murder September was investigating weapons trafficking between France and South Africa.

September, who was 52 at the time, was assassinated on the morning of March 28, 1988, outside the ANC’s Paris office. She was shot five times in the head with a 22-calibre silenced rifle.

The webinar was hosted by the South African embassy in France in conjunction with the Dullah Omar Institute of the UWC.

During the webinar September's friends and comrades spoke of her struggles for equality.

Close comrade and friend of September and herself an ANC representative in Europe at the time of September’s assassination Lindiwe Mabuza said: “As an ANC chief representative, it wasn’t easy to live in Europe because the apartheid regime had agents all over.”

Keynote speaker, International Relations and Co-operation Deputy Minister Candith Mashego-Dlamini said: “Dulcie September’s life was one of commitment to the liberation of humanity and it teaches us there’s no substitute to international solidarity.

“We must build a global movement in her memory against gender-based violence and patriarchy,” said Mashego-Dlamini.

Another comrade who spoke about September was political activist and former political prisoner Alexandre Moumbaris, who was born in Egypt to Greek parents, grew up in Australia, lived and worked in the UK, was imprisoned in South Africa and now lives in France.

Moumbaris said: “We count her among this galaxy of fearless women who fought for the liberation of South Africa, but also as a French heroine.”

Cape Argus

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