CPUT's Janet Condy, is calling for a new curriculum which provides deep, life-worthy learning, purposeful and of a higher level complexity in schools. Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)
Cape Town - The Cape Peninsula University of Technology’s newly appointed Literacy Development Research Unit chairperson, Janet Condy, is calling for a new curriculum which provides deep, life-worthy learning, purposeful and of a higher level complexity in schools.

Condy was calling for permission from the Western Cape Education Department to work with officials and teachers in its districts.

“I want to teach higher-order thinking and reading skills to teachers since their teaching is mainly focused on rote learning. This does not give learners opportunities to talk and think for themselves. The prescribed overloaded CAPS Curriculum does not allow time for these discussions and allow learners to draw on their prior lived experiences,” Condy said.

She plans to train curriculum developers and run teacher-capacity building programmes at schools in the Western Cape like she did in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Zambia and Mauritius.

Condy said the key objective of the research chair was to investigate the educational and socio-economic context in which poor children learn within disadvantaged communities and to find possible reasons and solutions for the low performance.

“The research project calls for deeper understanding of what schools do and what researchers can do to enhance the quality of schooling for poor children,” she said.

Condy made the call when she delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on Literacy Issues last month.

“Our CAPS curriculum needs content pruning to foreground the relevant 21st-century competencies, critical thinking and problem-solving, creativity and innovation, collaboration and teamwork, communication and informational literacy in technologically driven learner-centred teaching and learning that is purposeful,” Condy said.

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Cape Argus