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Calls for the halting of the Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project

The R101 million Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project is expected to provide 307 housing opportunities for qualifying beneficiaries. Picture: City of Cape Town/Supplied

The R101 million Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project is expected to provide 307 housing opportunities for qualifying beneficiaries. Picture: City of Cape Town/Supplied

Published Jul 6, 2022

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Cape Town - The SA National Civic Organisation (Sanco) in Sir Lowry’s Pass Village has called for a halt to the housing development until the City of Cape Town addresses the residents’ complaints.

The organisation complained that the City was being unresponsive.

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The residents’ complaints included unfair Expanded Public Works Programme rates paid to workers, the 10% Targeted Enterprise Contract Participation Goal, and lack of public participation.

Sanco also raised concerns about the lack of feedback on the sewerage connections of the units, which it said could not be connected to the already overloaded infrastructure which was collapsing. It also complained about the five-day period given for sub-contractors to submit the tendering information after the contract was posted.

The development, expected to be completed in 2024, would provide 307 units for approved beneficiaries.

Sanco organiser in ward 84, Riaan Hendricks, said: “Last year when the housing project started we approached the City raising these concerns but to date, none of them have been addressed.

“The City obligated the contractor to spend only 10% of the Targeted Enterprise Contract Participation Goal instead of 30% in the community for the SM MEs and labour, and our concern is (about) what’s happened to that remaining 20%,” he said.

With the civil work done, Hendricks said the structures went up in three weeks without residents knowing what the they would look like.

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“There needs to be public participation in the matter so the community gives its input. We don’t see the project being finished if the City doesn’t intervene, which will be a loss not only for the City but the community also.

“We have seen in the past what happens when the community is not consulted when such projects are undertaken. We do not want the project to stop to the detriment of the community, especially after 24 years since houses have been built in Sir Lowry’s Pass Village but if the City doesn’t come to the table and engage the community about the solutions to their complaints, we foresee some complications,” he said.

The Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project is expected to provide 307 housing opportunities for qualifying beneficiaries. Picture: City of Cape Town/Supplied

ASLA CEO Werner Jerling said that the construction company has been in close contact with Sanco, other community organisations, the community in general, and the project employees employed on the project in Sir Lowry’s Pass constantly since the inception of the project.

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“ASLA rejects the notion that it is unresponsive towards the community. ASLA has an open-door policy with Sanco and similar organisations,” he said.

Jerling said before project commencement extensive discussions on the EPWP wage, for this EPWP project were held and offers of employment, under the EPWP were made to and accepted by workers.

He said ASLA was in full compliance with the goals and is contractually bound to meet the targets set for this contract after the contract.

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The City said it was looking into the particulars of this matter and would respond in due course. It said it was in regular contact with the beneficiaries and had previously responded to the grievances made.

[email protected]

Cape Argus

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