Theewaterskloof Dam is overflowing. Capacity of dams slightly decreased from 100.8% to 100.5% between October 5 and 11. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency(ANA)
Theewaterskloof Dam is overflowing. Capacity of dams slightly decreased from 100.8% to 100.5% between October 5 and 11. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency(ANA)

Cape Town dam levels still above 100% despite slight decrease

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Oct 13, 2020

Share this article:

Cape Town - Dams supplying the Cape Town metro continue to sit above 100% despite a slight decrease from last week’s levels.

The total capacity of dams slightly decreased from 100.8% to 100.5% between October 5and 11– a 0.03% change from the previous week.

Water consumption for the same period increased by 31 million litres per day from an average of 660 million litres per day the previous week to 691 million litres per day.

At the same time last year, dam levels were at 81.9%.

Xanthea Limberg, mayoral committee member for water and waste, said: “The dam levels have still topped the 100% mark despite a minor drop in dam levels this past week.

“Questions around water tariffs and restrictions still remain topical. Residents are reminded that any decisions related to water tariffs and restrictions going forward will be mindful of residents’ praiseworthy relationship with water, and the City will seek to find an arrangement most beneficial to residents, and one that is sustainable for our water security.

“Consultations around appropriate tariffs and restrictions for the 2020/21 hydrological year (which runs from November 1 to October 31) are currently taking place,” Limberg said.

“Tariffs are currently on the second lowest level possible in terms of the City’s 2020/21 budget, and have come down significantly since the peak of the drought.

The no restriction, water-wise tariff which is under consideration, will provide some relief if implemented, but the possibility of tariff relief must be balanced against the extra funds needed to build additional resilience against climate change by investing in future water sources,“ said Limberg.

Anton Bredell, the MEC of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning, has also continued to call on the public to use water as responsibly and sparingly as possible.

“We are heading to the summer season where demand increases and when we may see dam levels starting to drop significantly. We need to continue to work together in managing our entire water system optimally.”

Bredell also thanked the public and other water users for the continued efforts over the past six years to driving down consumption.

“The drought has seen a great coming together of government, communities and other partners including NGOs. We want to thank each one for their efforts and assistance.”

Cape Argus

Share this article:

Related Articles