Joseph Meyer demonstrates how their system works. The City is trialing a food waste project and is asking people to register to be a participant in the small trial. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Joseph Meyer demonstrates how their system works. The City is trialing a food waste project and is asking people to register to be a participant in the small trial. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)

Capetonians called upon to help divert food waste from landfills

By Shakirah Thebus Time of article published Apr 12, 2021

Share this article:

Cape Town - The City of Cape Town is appealing to the public to take part in its organic food waste project, aimed at diverting food waste from landfills.

The pilot project will be trialled, to assess its efficacy and potential for further roll-out.

The national and provincial governments are setting a provincial target of 50% diversion of organic waste from landfill by 2022, and 100% diversion by 2027.

“In order to meet these targets, the City is already diverting a significant proportion of organic waste from landfill, through, for example, the garden waste chipping programme at City drop-offs as well as the home composting container programme, which has rolled out home composters to over 22 000 households already,” said mayco member for Water and Waste, Xanthea Limberg

“The City continues to investigate various methods for residents to divert their own food waste. This will help the City understand the most convenient, efficient and cost effective service to offer residents in future, to ensure food waste is diverted from landfill,” she said.

The food waste diversion project will operate from four City drop-off sites in Belhar, Killarney, Hout Bay, and Woodstock and with four pop-up sites in the Cape Town CBD, Claremont CBD, Durbanville, and Somerset West.

Participants will be issued a five litre bucket with information leaflet, to fill with organic food waste, temporarily storing it in the fridge or freezer, when the buckets are filled, the waste can be taken to their designated site where the bucket was received.

The bucket will then be decanted, cleaned and reissued to the individual. The project commenced on February 15 and will run until June 30, with 200 participants per site.

Woodstock drop-off facility foreman, Joseph Meyer said pamphlets are handed to visitors, informing them of the innovative project.

“Since we started the project, we have issued 69 buckets. So it is picking up,” he said.

For more information on the times for drop-off and exact location, contact [email protected]

Cape Argus

Share this article: