The Salt River Market. “The rezoning application for the Salt River Market site was approved," said Mayco member for human settlements, Malusi Booi. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency (ANA)
Cape Town - The City is looking into integrating various communities and moving residents closer to the CBD, it said.

Human settlements Mayco member Malusi Booi said the City’s human settlements directorate remained committed to providing hundreds of affordable and social housing opportunities around the city centre on sites such as the Salt River Market, Woodstock Hospital and Pine Road, as well as other areas.

“The rezoning application for the Salt River Market site was approved. The appeals period expired in June, and an appeals report will be referred to the mayor’s appeal committee for a decision. The Woodstock Hospital site has been earmarked for social housing opportunities,” he said.

“The planning of these opportunities can only formally commence once the acquisition of the property from the Western Cape government has been approved by the council. This process is under way and will be tabled at the council,” Booi added.

According to housing advocacy group Reclaim the City, in July 2017 the City promised that 11 sites in Woodstock and Salt River would be used for affordable housing. But two years later, little has changed. These sites include Upper Canterbury Street, New Market Street, Pine Road, where Fruit & Veg is located in Roeland Street, Dillon Lane, the Woodstock Hospital site, Woodstock Hospital park, and James Street. Reclaim the City accused the City of making “empty promises”.

“The City refutes this allegation. The City has not faltered on its commitment to provide hundreds of affordable and social housing opportunities around the city centre on sites such as the Salt River Market, Woodstock Hospital and Pine Road, as well as other areas across the city,” Booi said

Social housing law activist group Ndifuna Ukwazi has done a feasibility study on prime land within the CBD leased to various entities that they say can be used for affordable housing.The report, titled “City Leases”, cites Cape Town’s failure to redistribute land. The report focuses on one particular problem: leased land owned by the City of Cape Town that they say should be prioritised for redistribution, “but instead is used in an inefficient, exclusive and unsustainable manner”.

The report proposed five areas that could be used, including: Rondebosch Golf Club, Buitengracht Corridor, Harrington Square, Green Point Bowling Green, and Fish Hoek Bowling Green. It also identified 24 golf courses in the city located on public land.

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Cape Argus