Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said cleaning up illegal dumping cost the City R110 to R120 million a year. File photo: African News Agency (ANA)
Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said cleaning up illegal dumping cost the City R110 to R120 million a year. File photo: African News Agency (ANA)

City of Cape Town spends from R110m to R120m cleaning up illegal dumping

By Mthuthuzeli Ntseku Time of article published Oct 13, 2019

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Cape Town - The City said illegal dumping was increasing every year across the city. Mayco member for water and waste Xanthea Limberg said despite the establishment of drop-off facilities and legislation supporting waste disposal plans, the practise persisted. She said there were about 1000 large dumping hot spots across the City.

“Dumping occurs on a daily basis and it is simply not possible for cleansing staff to be in all areas at all times of the day. It is crucial that we work together in the fight against grime, by not littering/dumping, and reporting those who do,” she said.

Limberg said cleaning up illegal dumping cost the City R110 to R120 million a year.

She said cleaning up illegally dumped waste was about 20 times more expensive than collecting it from individual wheelie bins, as specialised equipment, including front-end loaders, must be hired to remove the waste.

Greentumble founder Sara Slavikova said people dumped their waste illegally for a number of reasons.

“They may be trying to avoid disposal fees, or may simply be too lazy Factories or work teams can have significant waste disposal costs, so the incentive to dump illegally can be high,” she said.

“If garbage is dumped in an area accessible to the public – and especially children – such as a parks, then people can be exposed to health and injury risks.

“The clean-up of illegally dumped garbage costs millions, if not billions per year. This money could be better used in the preservation and care of the environment, rather than in the clean-up of completely preventable and thoughtless dumping,” Slavikova said. 

She encouraged recycling.

Chad Robertson Regenize, a co- founder of a recycle-tech company, said only 7.5% of South African residents recycled.

“Over 90% of our waste that could be recycled ends up in landfills. In a country dealing with many issues, recycling is not a priority, and falls on the wayside,” he said.

@Mtuzeli

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Cape Argus

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