Dam levels in the Western Cape are currently at an average combined level of 45%, last year at this time the average level was 22.6%. File Picture.
Cape Town - Dam levels in the Western Cape are currently at an average combined level of 45%, l ast year at this time the average level was 22.6%.

The MEC of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning, Anton Bredell  in the Western Cape, says while recent rainfall in the Karoo region has brought slight relief to some parts, the rain has not been sufficient to break the ongoing drought.

“In December Beaufort-West usually gets around 28mm of rainfall and in January months it is around 20mm every year. This past December the town got 0 mm in December and 2 mm in January. The province remains in the area on a fulltime basis assisting with drought alleviation projects.”

Bredell has urged consumers to continue to use water responsibly, even in areas where there may be no water challenges.

“Overall the Karoo region remains extremely dry but other areas are also seeing dam levels running lower at the beginning of Autumn. We are headed to the winter and we are hopeful on another season of good rainfall in the coming months.”

Bredell has urged farmers and farmworkers in drought afflicted areas to contact the provincial government or any other stakeholders for assistance during this time.

“The ongoing burden of drought is a terrible one to bear alone and the province has a number of measures in place that may be of help.”

The City of Cape Town has also then reminded residents that Level 3 water restrictions are in place which includes the following, among others:
  • Daily usage of 105 litres per person per day in total irrespective of whether you are at home, work or elsewhere
  • Washing of vehicles, trailers, caravans and boats with municipal drinking water is only allowed if using a bucket. Washing with non-drinking water or cleaning with waterless products or dry steam cleaning processes is strongly encouraged
  • You are encouraged to flush toilets with greywater, rainwater or other non-drinking water
  • Commercial car wash industries must comply with industry best practice norms regarding water usage per car washed and recycle or reuse a minimum of 50% of water used
  • No watering/irrigation with municipal drinking water within 48 hours of rainfall that provides adequate saturation
  • Washing vehicles, trailers, caravans and boats with municipal drinking water is only allowed if using a bucket. Washing with non-drinking water or cleaning with waterless products or dry steam cleaning processes is strongly encouraged
  • Watering/irrigation with municipal drinking water allowed only on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays before 09:00 or after 18:00 for a maximum of one hour per property and only if using a bucket or watering can. No use of hosepipes or any sprinkler systems allowed
  • Borehole/wellpoint water must be used efficiently to avoid wastage and evaporation. Borehole/wellpoint water users are strongly encouraged to follow the same watering times as applicable to municipal drinking water use detailed above

Dam Levels

The average dam level in the Western Cape is currently 45.07% (2018: 22.6%). 

Dams that supply the City of Cape Town with water have an average level of 56.8% (2018: 24.5%). 

The Theewaterskloof dam is currently at 44.1% (2018: 11.7%); Voëlvlei Dam is at 71.5% (2018: 17.3%), Berg River dam is at 78.8% (2018: 52.3%) and Clanwilliam Dam is 46.3% (2018: 13.1%).

The average dam level in the Western Cape is currently 45.07% (2018: 22.6%). Dams that supply the City of Cape Town with water have an average level of 56.8% (2018: 24.5%).
@TheCapeArgus


Cape Argus