Premier Alan Winde believes this therapy can be administered in general wards, under the correct supervision, which will minimise the need for critical-care beds. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)
Premier Alan Winde believes this therapy can be administered in general wards, under the correct supervision, which will minimise the need for critical-care beds. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)

High-flow nasal oxygen, dexamethasone helping keep Covid-19 at bay in Western Cape

By Shakirah Thebus Time of article published Jul 13, 2020

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Cape Town - The use of high-flow nasal oxygen and of the steroid dexamethasone have emerged as very successful treatments of more severe cases of the coronavirus (Covid-19).

So said premier Alan Winde in the latest provincial update on Covid-19.

At present, 289 people are in the intensive care unit (ICU) or high care, with 627 people having been hospitalised due to the virus.

The province recorded 16063 active cases of Covid-19, 77476 confirmed cases and 59070 recoveries as of 1pm on Sunday.

To date, 2343 people have succumbed to the virus. The number of tests conducted is at 350961.

There remain 6685 confirmed cases of the virus unallocated, with 4010 recoveries made.

Winde said the province has recorded close to 60000 recoveries since the virus was first detected in the province on March 11.

“The world is constantly learning and developing new knowledge about Covid-19 and how to manage this disease. But despite the advancements in science and medicine which can help to save lives, the most basic rules of hand washing, hygiene, mask wearing and physical distancing are still the most effective tools we have to prevent the spread of the virus,” said Winde.

He said many who contract the virus will experience mild symptoms, which include a sore throat, a fever, a loss of smell and taste, a cough, tiredness, and body aches and pains.

These can be treated at home, however, the person must self-isolate for 14 days to ensure that the virus does not pass on to people nearby or in close spaces.

Winde said anyone experiencing trouble breathing or shortness of breath should seek out medical attention.

“People who fall into the high risk categories, which include people over the age of 55, or those with underlying illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, HIV, or any heart, lung or kidney disease, should also monitor their symptoms closely and take extra precautions.

“Others may have the virus and experience no symptoms at all. That is why it is important to continue to wash your hands, clean surfaces, practise physical distancing and wear a cloth mask even when feeling well.

“Covid-19 will be with us for a long time still and staying home as much as possible, and abiding by the golden rules, can help to keep you and your loved ones safe.”

@TheCapeArgus

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Cape Argus

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