Independent Online

Saturday, July 2, 2022

Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView weather by locationView market indicators

Male baboon from Smitswinkel Bay troop given a second chance to integrate with the Da Gama troop

Scott (SWB12) a dispersing (leaves birth group) male baboon from the Smitswinkel Bay troop has been given a second opportunity to be relocated to the Da Gama Park troop.

Scott (SWB12) a dispersing (leaves birth group) male baboon from the Smitswinkel Bay troop has been given a second opportunity to be relocated to the Da Gama Park troop.

Published Jan 24, 2022

Share

Cape Town - Conservation groups have welcomed a joint decision by the City, Cape of Good Hope SPCA, and Cape Nature to give a young dispersing male baboon from the Smitswinkel Bay troop, Scott (SWB12), a second chance at integrating with the Da Gama troop.

Scott was scheduled to be captured and relocated last month following public pressure from the interest groups after concerns about his safety in the urban area.

Story continues below Advertisement

However, the attempts failed and he has since been spending his time in Simon’s Town and surrounds, reportedly displaying raiding behaviour.

The authorities said a new methodology would be applied during his capture and release in an effort to increase his chances of successful integration.

The methodology would include exposure to the troop before and after his release within the troop’s home range, where he would be given time to integrate. Failing which, the authorities said the last resort would be euthanasia.

Councillor Appointed Representative for Baboons (Carbs) for Smitswinkel Bay Chantal Carstens-Luyt said NCC Environmental Services' plan of placing Scott closer to the troop before release was much better.

Carstens-Luyt said should the relocation not work again, she hoped that authorities may look at other alternatives before euthanising him. She said there were other options to consider first.

“Killing ‘problem baboons’ is not the answer. Educating humans and making your home baboon-proof is, but there does not seem to be much interest from certain residents who live in baboon-frequented areas.

Story continues below Advertisement

“Some intolerant homeowners feel that the wildlife in the area should be ‘dealt with accordingly’ even though they choose to live along the urban edge.

“My feelings are, if you are not happy with the wildlife living around you then rather move to an area where you won’t be frequented by them,” she said.

Beauty Without Cruelty SA chairperson Toni Brockhoven said baboons do not raid, as that is human behaviour.

Story continues below Advertisement

“Baboons do not raid but forage, the use of the term demonises them. Until humans ensure we respect the environment and don’t leave food out, ensure bins are baboon proof, not leaving food visible, we cannot expect the baboons to ignore nutrient-rich food easily available,” Brockhoven said.

[email protected]

Cape Argus

Story continues below Advertisement

Share