The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) was established 75 years ago in the precinct of the St George’s Cathedral. Picture: MJC website
The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) was established 75 years ago in the precinct of the St George’s Cathedral. Picture: MJC website

Muslim Judicial Council celebrates 75-year history

By Shakirah Thebus Time of article published Feb 13, 2020

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Cape Town - The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) was established 75 years ago in the precinct of the St George’s Cathedral. 

Deputy president of the MJC, Moulana Abdul Khaliq Ebrahim Allie, said that at the gathering which took place in 1945, Islamic scholars and academics in Cape Town assembled and drafted and agreed on a 10-point plan outlining the organisation’s mission.

“Among those points were the preservation of Islam and Islamic teachings and Islamic identity; to create unity and understanding and co-operation among all scholars and the broader community; to further the education and academic progress of the community; to be the judiciary for the Muslim community and to provide social services to the broader community.”

With its 75th anniversary this year, the organisation aims to showcase projects it is facilitating and previous work over the past few years.

“Over the period of 75 years, the MJC - despite the many internal and external challenges - has arrived at a point where most of those points have been achieved and accomplished,” said Allie.

Along with hosting the majority of the mosques, the MJC played a pivotal role in the national formation of the Islamic body known as the United Ulama Council of SA (UUCSA).

“Once it has taken the responsibility of preserving the Islamic identity and Islamic teachings and values, it had to, and it must, contribute towards the development of the country. Our political vision is, we need to strive continuously for the South Africa that we want to live in for all South Africans,” said Allie.

He said the MJC had been active in the rebuke of the apartheid government.

“During the apartheid era, it rejected the Group Areas Act, it stood with oppressed masses and at the same time, some of its members were exiled. We are committed to making sure that South Africa remains a place of safety and therefore security is fundamental for the MJC,” said Allie.

The function of the organisation was also to be an active member in the interfaith domain and to work towards social cohesion.

“It has been a practise that we have condemned all forms of extremist and terrorist attacks across the globe because it is so very important to showcase that Islam is a religion of peace, of harmony, of safety and security for all.

“We want to continue further to hold our community together and to offer the necessary guidance to religious leaders,” he said.

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