Residents who were evicted from Albert Road in Woodstock last year say they are still waiting for social housing to be built in the area. Picture: Supplied
Cape Town - Residents who were evicted from Albert Road in Woodstock last year say they are still waiting for social housing to be built in the area.

The 14 families are currently staying in the old Woodstock Hospital in Woodstock.

Fagmieda Ling, a member of one of the families that had been evicted from Albert Road, said that there was no alternative at the time but to move to the hospital.

“The only alternative accommodation the City gave us was Wolwerivier, which is close to Atlantis, but we did not want to move there because it is too far away. We only know Woodstock and no other areas.

“My children attend school in this area. There are no schools and hospitals in Wolwerivier,” Ling said.

Last week, the City of Cape Town said that it had obtained “a final interdict against further illegal occupation of the Woodstock Hospital site”.

The order also did not allow existing occupiers to further erect or extend any structures or to bring in furniture. In response to a media enquiry that concerned social housing, the City said it was “committed to providing housing opportunities, including social housing to all qualifying beneficiaries”.

In 2017, the City of Cape Town announced that it would be building social and affordable housing in Salt River and Woodstock.

Brett Herron, former mayoral committee member for transport and urban development, said that the housing would be built on well-located, City-owned land.

Herron added that the sites that the City had identified were situated less than five kilometres away from the Cape Town central business district.

“The development of 11 City-owned sites were in Salt River, Woodstock and the inner-city for inclusionary housing.” he said.

“Affordable housing opportunities must also assist us to preserve the social diversity and unique character of areas like Woodstock and Salt River in the midst of rapid urbanisation and rising property prices,” Herron added.

“Furthermore, it must expedite the provision of affordable housing on well-located land close to work opportunities and public transport.

“We estimate that, once completed, the developments will benefit at least 4 000 lower-income households,” he said.

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Cape Argus