People and animals that had come into contact with the original two cases have been traced, and appropriate follow-up action has been taken. Picture: Supplied
People and animals that had come into contact with the original two cases have been traced, and appropriate follow-up action has been taken. Picture: Supplied

Over 900 dogs vaccinated in Khayelitsha to prevent further rabies cases

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Aug 31, 2021

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CAPE TOWN — The Western Cape’s Department of Agriculture Veterinary Services have vaccinated more than 900 dogs and 10 cats after a rabies outbreak was reported in Khayelitsha last week.

The provincial department said no further cases have been detected following last week’s announcement that two rabies cases had been confirmed in Khayelitsha.

People and animals that had come into contact with the two cases have been traced, and appropriate follow-up action has been taken, including vaccinations and medical treatment.

Agriculture MEC Ivan Meyer said: “Veterinary Services officials and animal welfare organisations have been going door to door throughout last week to vaccinate all dogs and cats within a 1km radius of the confirmed cases.

“So far, we have vaccinated over 900 dogs and 10 cats.

“Pet owners who were not home at the time of the official visit and who still need their pets to be vaccinated should call the office of the State Veterinarian on 021 808 5253 or visit the nearest animal welfare clinic to arrange vaccination.”

Animal Health technician Rudolf Nieuwehuis administers a rabies vaccination. Picture: Supplied

The public should report any signs of rabies to their nearest vet, animal welfare clinic or the State Veterinarian on 021 808 5253.

Signs of rabies include sudden changes in behaviour (including aggression, confusion or anxiety), weakness, drooling, difficulty swallowing, staggering, seizures, muscle spasms and paralysis. These symptoms grow worse over time, and death occurs within two to 10 days.

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