On arrival at the Auwul Mosque, Their Royal Highnesses will be met by Imam Sheikh Ismail Londt and Muslim community leader, Mohamed Groenwald. They will introduce Their Royal Highnesses to faith leaders, and invite them to view the first known manuscript of the Qu’ran in South Africa, which was drafted by Tuan Guru (first Imam) from memory while he was imprisoned on Robben Island. Picture Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Cape Town - The Duke and Duchess of Sussex began the second day of their South African tour at Monwabisi beach to see the work of Waves for Change (W4C).

An NGO, W4C supports local surfers who do mentoring. They also provide mental health services to vulnerable young people living in under-resourced communities. Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, met the surfing mentors and took a walk to the beach for a group activity to promote positive thinking.

At the W4C compound is The Lunchbox Fund, one of four charities to benefit from the generous public donations made on the occasion of the birth of the couple’s son, Archie Mountbatten-Windsor.

Monwabisi beach borders one of South Africa’s biggest townships, Khayelitsha.

The fund provides nearly 30000 nutritious meals daily to programmes in townships and rural areas, including three W4C initiatives.

The couple visited the home’s kitchen to hear about the work of the Commonwealth Litter Programme, that funds research and tackling plastic waste in the Commonwealth.

The couple spoke to journalists at Monwabisi beach. The duchess said, “the fact that we are able to be here together and see on the ground so much good work being done, just because people are willing to talk to each other about it and someone is willing to listen”.

“That’s huge and if that can apply to being here it can apply to London and LA It doesn’t matter where you are, we are all sort of trying to power through some optimism.”

Prince Harry also spoke candidly about mental health. He spoke to journalists about the stigma surrounding mental health.

“I think mostly the stigma is around mental illness. But we need to separate the two: mental health, which is every single one of us, and mental illness which could be every single one of us,” he said.

He and Oprah Winfrey are co- creators and executive producers of a documentary on mental health.

The couple also visited the Auwal Mosque, built in 1794 in the Bo-Kaap, where they met faith leaders.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex visit Auwal Mosque in Bo-Kaap on Heritage Day Built in 1794 during British occupation of the Cape of Good Hope, Auwal Mosque is the first and oldest mosque in South Africa. Picture Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Islam was first introduced in South Africa by exiled Muslim leaders and Cape Malay slaves in the late 1600-1700s. Prior to British occupation, slaves were not allowed to worship Islam. Picture: Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Prior to British occupation, slaves were not allowed to worship Islam. Today, for the Muslim community, this mosque symbolises the freedom of former slaves to worship. Picture: Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
On arrival at the Auwul Mosque, Their Royal Highnesses were met by Imam Sheikh Ismail Londt and Muslim community leader, Mohamed Groenwald. They introduced Their Royal Highnesses to faith leaders, and invite them to view the first known manuscript of the Qu’ran in South Africa, which was drafted by Tuan Guru (first Imam) from memory while he was imprisoned on Robben Island. Picture: Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Picture: Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Picture: Bashiera Parker/POOL/African News Agency(ANA)
Their Royal Highnesses departed the Auwal Mosque and take a short car journey up the road, where they were met by community leader Jacky Poking, who walked with them to the top of Chiappini Street to greet residents. Next, Their Royal Highnesses entered the home of a local resident at 128 Chiappini Street, met with the family, and shared a beverage and some treats with the residents. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex visited Bo-Kaap on Heritage Day. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency(ANA)
Britain's Prince Harry, and his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, have afternoon tea during a walkabout in Bo-Kaap, a heritage site, in Cape Town. The royal couple are on their second day of their African visit. Picture: Courtney Africa / African News Agency via AP, Pool)
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, take a drink as they visit a family in the Bo-Kaap district of Cape Town. REUTERS/Toby Melville
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