Nineteen families will move to transitional houses in Salt River after the homes were officially opened by City of Cape Town. Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African news agency (ANA)

Cape Town - Nineteen families will move to transitional houses in Salt River after the homes were officially opened by City of Cape Town.

The City’s Mayco member for human settlements, Malusi Booi, along with various officials and media, visited the housing project site in Copperfield Street on Thursday to monitor progress.

The purpose of the transitional housing is to provide temporary accommodation for the 72 individuals staying at the informal settlement on the Pine Road site in Salt River. The construction of the new social housing will commence at the informal settlement during the year.

The transitional housing will be available for individuals who earn a minimum of R1500 and lower, while the social housing is for individuals who earn from R1500 to R15000.

Site visit to City’s first transitional housing project in Salt River The City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Human Settlements Councillor Malusi Booi visited the City’s first transitional housing project site in Salt River, to check on its progress. Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)
Bheki Dlamini painting at the new site. Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)

The transitional housing has been under development for two years and should be complete by the beginning of May. There are 42 units with kitchen and bathroom facilities, developed at a cost of approximately R11 million from national government grant funding.

“We are just awaiting an occupational certificate because safety inspectors need the doors of the development to be fireproof. Once this is completed we can move the people in,” said Booi.

“The individuals are extremely excited because they are not living in good conditions. This winter, they will be in a warmer, decent place. Social development will also provide support to the families,” he said.

“Once the social housing is complete, applications will be processed again for those residing in the transitional housing, and if they qualify, they can move into the new homes. Those who don’t will remain in Copperfield Street,” said Conrad Meyer, project facilitator from the Development Action Group.

Meyer said many at the informal settlement work in the City Bowl and have family members in the area, so it would be beneficial for them to move into homes within the City where they have lived for the last 20 years.

The City is busy with the construction of five social housing projects which include Bothasig, The Block, Glen Haven and Weltevreden Park.

The purpose of this site will be to provide short-term accommodation to the households who are currently residing in an informal settlement on the Pine Road site, which will be developed to unlock social housing (affordable rental) opportunities.Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)
Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)
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