The release of the Municipal Economic Review and Outlook (Mero) report painted a bleak picture of an ever-growing housing crisis in Cape Town. File Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
Cape Town - The release of the Municipal Economic Review and Outlook (Mero) report painted a bleak picture of an ever-growing housing crisis in Cape Town.

The report indicated that in 2018, the Cape Metro area had 1230145 dwellings. A large share of dwellings in the region were structures of houses or bricks on a separate yard.

It is estimated that 12.7% of the dwellings were classified as informal in 2018. It also stated that access to services in the Cape Metro area had been steadily increasing since 2015. Between 2016 and 2017, there was a significant increase of 237254 consumers with access to electricity. The number of households with access to sanitation was significantly lower than that of other services.

Mayoral committee member for human settlements Malusi Booi said: “The city takes a long-term view to the growth and development of Cape Town. It analyses the macro and local environment. The city takes a planned and systematic approach to development. That is why the city emphasises time and again that partnerships and support are required and that phenomena such as illegal occupations or land invasions scupper the planned delivery of services and development.”

As at the end of June, there were an estimated 1381400 households living in Cape Town, with 12.2% of these households living in dwellings in informal settlements and 6.35% living in informal dwellings in backyards.

“To tackle the requirements of high urbanisation, we are all going to have to start standing together. This is not a municipal issue alone. It involves all levels of government and the society as a whole,” he said.

Last year, the Mero report stated that by the end of July 2018, a total of 578173 households in the Western Cape had registered their demand for housing. The biggest share of the demand, at 61.5%, was based within the City of Cape Town due to the concentration of the provincial population in the metropole.

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Cape Argus