Reverend Dolley-Major, supported by One Billion Rising SA, after she had publicly named her alleged rapist, on the steps of the St George's Cathedral, in March 2021. Picture: Shakirah Thebus/Cape Argus
Reverend Dolley-Major, supported by One Billion Rising SA, after she had publicly named her alleged rapist, on the steps of the St George's Cathedral, in March 2021. Picture: Shakirah Thebus/Cape Argus

Reverend June Dolley-Major ecstatic over gag order win against alleged rapist

By Shakirah Thebus Time of article published Aug 31, 2021

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Cape Town - Overcome by emotions and the colossal significance behind ruling, Anglican Church Reverend June Dolley-Major expressed gratitude over the gag order win.

The urgent application for the interdict was brought against Dolley-Major in March, at the Western Cape High Court, by the Anglican Church reverend, who Dolley-Major had accused of rape.

She said the rape occurred in 2002, in Makhanda, and started posting about it on her social media in 2016.

The outcome of the case was heard virtually on Monday, with the court dismissing the case – in which the alleged rapist sought to interdict Dolley-Major from posting about him publicly and on social media.

Dolley-Major acknowledged that it was not just a personal win, but had given survivors of rape hope.

“It's been a long journey. This is a victory, not just for myself but for every survivor. Its a win for South Africa today, where we’re saying we don’t want South Africa to be the rape capital of the world anymore.

“Rape is not going to be the heritage of our country. I am at a loss for words about this. History was made in our lifetime. We changed the narrative in our lifetime, and I'm really happy about that,” said Dolley-Major.

“Before you could not say the name of your rapist, because he was not found guilty in a court of law,” said Dolley-Major.

The Women’s Legal Centre (WLC) was admitted as a friend of the court, in the landmark case, on July 29.

WLC attorney Chriscy Blouws said the court found that the plaintiff did not meet all of the requirements for a final interdict, and that he withheld important information from the court.

“The WLC welcomes the judgment, as it has recognised the impact on all women who are trying to navigate the horror of rape in SA.The judgment is a sign of hope to survivors of rape, which encourages women to speak out and believes survivors – instead of silencing them,” said Blouws.

One Billion Rising SA (OBRSA) has supported Dolley-Major since her first hunger strike in 2016, to raise awareness about the alleged rape.

OBRSA director Lucinda Evans welcomed the outcome.

“Our faith in the justice system has been restored,” said Evans.

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