Nelson Modolo (52) getting vaccinated. The Souper Troopers and Western Cape Health Department vaccinated willing homeless people at the Sea Point Methodist Church. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Nelson Modolo (52) getting vaccinated. The Souper Troopers and Western Cape Health Department vaccinated willing homeless people at the Sea Point Methodist Church. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)

Sea Point church opens its doors to let nearly 250 homeless people get the Covid-19 jab

By Mthuthuzeli Ntseku Time of article published Sep 10, 2021

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Cape Town - With the province’s Covid-19 numbers of active infections having reached 22 514 by Wednesday, the provincial Health Department in partnership with NGOs is moving forward with the vaccination of homeless people.

Close to 250 homeless people received jabs yesterday at the Sea Point Methodist church, in partnership with Souper Troopers.

The venue is one of the 10 sites that were assigned by the department in collaboration with NGOs and shelters for the vaccination of homeless people.

Souper Troopers founder Kerry Hoffman said they were motivated by the willingness shown by the homeless people to get vaccinated.

“The majority of homeless people are quite keen to be vaccinated because they understand that it has got to do with their health. It’s done in a dignified manner and is not forced. They understand that it’s their democratic and human right to be vaccinated.

“There are a few of those that do not want to be vaccinated, however it is their choice but we can hope that they reconsider after we have shared education on the virus and the vaccine. We have stepped forward in partnership with other organisations and the department to ensure that the homeless and the marginalised people are seen and heard and provided the same opportunities,” she said.

Hoffman said almost 90 percent of those that were vaccinated yesterday had no IDs and had not registered. She said more sites would be opened in Claremont and Wynberg by different NGOs where the homeless vaccination would continue.

Field worker Tasneem Hussein Felies said follow-ups would be done to those that had received the vaccination to ensure that medical assistance was provided for possible side-effects.

“The side-effect is mostly pain that requires Panado. However, we have explained to them what symptoms they should look out for. No side-effects were reported in the first group that got vaccinated and we hope that none would be experienced,” she said.

Methodist church reverend Solomzi Ralo said it was important that places like churches be allowed to be used in a way that honoured, respected and valued people. Ralo said they were happy to partner and assist in whatever way the church could.

He said the church promoted vaccination and called upon those that had not been vaccinated to heed the call.

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