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Sir Lowry’s Pass Village: City of Cape Town, contractor refutes 'unresponsiveness' claims

The R101 million Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project is expected to provide 307 housing opportunities for qualifying beneficiaries. Picture: City of Cape Town/Supplied

The R101 million Sir Lowry’s Pass Village housing project is expected to provide 307 housing opportunities for qualifying beneficiaries. Picture: City of Cape Town/Supplied

Published Jul 11, 2022

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Cape Town - The City of Cape Town has hit back at Sanco leaders in the Helderberg area who called for the halt of the Sir Lowry’s Pass village housing development until their grievances were addressed.

The City said its housing development department replied to Sanco on March 8 and addressed all of their concerns. Meanwhile, the contractor ASLA also rejected what it said was a notion by Sanco that it was unresponsive towards the community.

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Sanco’s complaints, among others, included unfair EPWP rates paid to workers,10% targeted enterprise contract participation goal instead of 30%, and lack of public participation.

Sanco also raised concerns about the lack of feedback on the sewage connections of the units, which it said can’t be connected to the already overloaded sewage infrastructure, which is collapsing.

It also complained about the five-day period that was given for sub-contractors to submit the tendering information after the contract was posted.

Human settlements mayco member Malusi Booi said further to the City’s response that regular PEC meetings, where its members included Sanco’s, were held where feedback to the community was given.

“The project has been handled in terms of statutory requirements with an elected PEC in place which is fully aware of the project’s details.

“At the start of the project, a public meeting was held in Sir Lowry’s Pass Village Community hall on June 17, 2014 where the project was first presented to the community.

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“Later, the human settlements directorate together with the City’s public participation unit again invited the public to a meeting held in the community hall on February 26, 2015.

“The meeting was advertised in the local papers on February 12, 2015. The purpose of this meeting was to elect the PEC for the project, who were then responsible to communicate all project-related matters and decisions back to the community.

“Monthly PEC meetings are being held to keep the PEC informed of progress on the project,” he said.

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ASLA CEO Werner Jerling said ASLA had been in phone contact with Sanco, which he said requested a meeting, and in return requested a list of suitable times and dates which he said had not been received to date.

Jerling said before project commencement, extensive discussions on the EPWP wage were held and offers of employment under the EPWP were made to and accepted by workers.

Regarding the targeted enterprise contract participation, he said contract participation goals were regulated in the construction contract entered into between the City and ASLA and that the contractor was in full compliance with the goals and was contractually bound to meet the targets set for the contract on its conclusion.

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The project is expected to be completed in mid-2024.

[email protected]

Cape Argus

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