Reclaim the City supporters protested outside deputy mayor Ian Neilson’s home in Table View on Tuesday. Picture: Supplied
Reclaim the City supporters protested outside deputy mayor Ian Neilson’s home in Table View on Tuesday. Picture: Supplied

Social housing activists stage protest at house of Cape deputy mayor

By Marvin Charles Time of article published Nov 28, 2018

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Cape Town - Social housing activist group Reclaim the City staged a morning protest at the home of deputy mayor Ian Neilson in Table View, to object to the delay in the investigation into the Site B land auction on the Foreshore.

“It’s been two months since we exposed the City’s botched auction. Ian Neilson was mayco member for finance in charge of property management at the time. He knows what happened. He first deflected, then went silent,” said Reclaim the City's Nkosikhona Swaartbooi.

“Former mayor Patricia de Lille asked the city manager to conduct a forensic investigation. Even today, we don’t know what the terms of reference are, who will investigate this, and the deadline."

Last month, De Lille ordered a forensic investigation into the auction of City property on the Foreshore that was severely undervalued. In September, social housing advocacy group Ndifuna Ukwazi sounded the alarm after they obtained documents which raised serious questions about top City officials allegedly implicated in a so-called botched auction of the land.

The City gave notice in local newspapers of an application by Growthpoint Properties Limited to develop Site B - a 3 932m² piece of land.

Growthpoint plans to develop a skyscraper that “aims to be a world-class, timeless, innovative, sustainable building, which will serve to inspire future buildings”.

What caught the organisation’s eye in the notice was Growthpoint was asserting it already had the rights to build 46 000m².

“Land is at the heart of transformation of our city and our society. Public land should only be sold when it cannot be used for service delivery and then the City must get a fair market price. This price was not fair. Too often public officials and politicians hide behind processes in the hope that the issue will get kicked into the long grass. When it comes to public land and public money, we need public accountability,” Swaartbooi said.

@MarvinCharles17

[email protected]

Cape Argus

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