Rob Packham allegedly hit his wife, Gill Packham, twice with an unknown object, on the jaw and head, before moving her from the driving seat to the boot of her car. Picture: Zodidi Dano/Cape Argus
Cape Town - Rob Packham allegedly hit his wife, Gill Packham, twice with an unknown object, on the jaw and head, before moving her from the driving seat to the boot of her car and later set the car alight at the Diep River railway station.

State prosecutor Susan Galloway completed her cross-examination on Wednesday.

Galloway put it to Packham that on the morning of Gill’s disappearance, on February 22, last year, that he attacked his wife following a fight they had the night before.

“You found yourself in a tight spot due to your long running affair with witness X and your wife’s apparent still upsetness about your continuous disclosures about your infidelity.

“You might have even attacked her when she was already in the car,” said Galloway.

It is the state’s case that blood droplets found in garage could have come from Packham’s hands or the murder weapon. “You proceeded to move her to the boot of the car leaving droplets at the garage; you having handled the murder weapon explains the blood on the driver’s handle inside your car,” added Galloway. Gill’s car was allegedly locked when it was set alight.

Galloway said the sequence of events would explain why Packham didn’t put much effort in filing a missing persons report and why he didn’t seek help in the search for Gill.

“You knew where she was and where her car was,” she said.

Galloway said Packham left Gill’s BMW at Diep River railway station after he was allegedly seen by Paul Gray, a witness who placed him at Gill’s car at about 2pm in Lucius Way, Constantia, that day.

“At 9.30pm you simply set the car alight. Hoping all evidence will be ruined and your wife will be another hijacking statistic.”

Packham replied: “I categorically deny that.”

It was put to him if the court accep- ted his version that Gill was hijacked that morning and her killer was in the same vicinity as Packham for three hours, he said it was a possibility.

He said the axe handle found in the garage broke two years ago and they were not using it.

“I had forgotten about it.”

Galloway said it appeared Packham changed his narrative depending on who he spoke to. With his sister and daughters, he sounded distressed but was calm with police.

She accused him of tending to send people unsolicited information or communication when he wanted them to agree with whatever he was proposing.

“You sent Lodewyk van Rensburg (colleague) an unsolicited message to remind him to lie,” she said.

Packham replied: “Unsolicited gives an ugly tone. I was just asking a colleague for help."

The defence closed its case. Arguments will be heard on April 24.

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Cape Argus