Karen Hendrecks of the Woodstock Hospital said people had no faith in the database because there had been no progress and no houses built. Picture: Marvin Charles/Cape Argus
Karen Hendrecks of the Woodstock Hospital said people had no faith in the database because there had been no progress and no houses built. Picture: Marvin Charles/Cape Argus

WATCH: Housing database meaningless according to families occupying old Woodstock Hospital

By Marvin Charles Time of article published Nov 16, 2020

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Cape Town – Families occupying the old Woodstock Hospital premises illegally said they are tired of waiting for houses.

Leader Karen Hendricks said: “People cannot live inside of that housing database because currently that is what it has been.

“It has been this way for the past 25 years, where people have lived on this database and people know there are more homeless people due to Covid-19.”

Hendricks said people had no faith in the database because there had been no progress and no houses built.

“There are no talks of the allocation process of the sites identified by the City for affordable housing in the inner city. Because of the failure to build housing, it has caused the housing database to be something meaningless and grow,” said Hendricks.

Michael Clark, researcher at Ndifuna Ukwazi, said: “The housing allocation system is actually very complicated and there’s a perception that there is a waiting list that works in a rational way... that works in a need-based way; this is not true.

“There are a lot of people on this database; there are multiple databases and there is no clear correlation how they relate to one another other than they are linked. In the context of Cape Town, if you are not on the City’s database you can’t qualify for a house.”

According to statements last year from the province, there are 600 000 people on their housing database; 365 000 are in the City and there are indications this number could be growing each year.

The Department of Human Settlements director of communications Nathan Adriaanse said: “The increase in the housing list cannot be ascribed to the lockdown in any way. What you need to understand is that the provincial department has had significant budget cuts which means we have to do the best we can with the available financial resources.”

Mayco member for Human Settlements Malusi Booi said: “There has not been enough evidence to say that there has been a significant increase in databases. We are experiencing urbanisation and its not only happening in the city, it’s happening across the globe.”

Read more by Booi here: “City of Cape Town’s database ensures fair allocation of housing

Cape Argus

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