The Western Cape has 10 097 active Covid-19 cases, with a total of 23 095 confirmed cases, 12 436 recoveries, and 992 people in hospital.. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)
The Western Cape has 10 097 active Covid-19 cases, with a total of 23 095 confirmed cases, 12 436 recoveries, and 992 people in hospital.. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)

Western Cape records 41 more Covid-19 deaths with nearly 1 000 people in hospital

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Jun 2, 2020

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Cape Town - The Western Cape has recorded 41 more Covid-19 deaths, bringing the total number of deaths from the virus in the province to 562.

As of 1pm on Tuesday, 2 June, the Western Cape had 10 097 active Covid-19 cases, with a total of 23 095 confirmed cases and 12 436 recoveries. There are 992 people in hospital of which 179 are in ICU or high care.

Premier Alan Winde has extended his condolences to the families who have lost their loved ones as the virus continues to spread in the province.

The national Department of Health figures for the Western Cape differ from those announced by Winde daily because the national figures are compiled from data supplied before the provincial figures are announced.

Picture: Western Cape Government Dashboard.

Vulnerable groups:

Premier Alan Winde said that the Western Cape Government has conducted another review of all of the comorbidities associated with Covid-19 deaths in the province. 

When the data review was done on 26 May, the province had recorded 403 deaths at the time, with the majority of these having one or more comorbidities.

Winde said that data has revealed that the top three comorbidities per age group were:

Top three comorbidities per age group:

  • 20 – 39 years (30% diabetes, 25% HIV, 20% Hypertension)
  • 40 – 49 years (51% diabetes, 33% HIV, 28% Hypertension)
  • 50 – 59 years (70% Diabetes, 63% Hypertension, 27% HIV)

Diabetes and hypertension were the most prevalent comorbidities in deaths due to Covid-19 across all age groups.

"The majority of people who contract Covid-19 will experience mild symptoms and will be able to isolate and recover at home. However, those who are over the age of 55 or with underlying health conditions are most at risk of becoming seriously ill. 

"This is why our health response must place a special focus on these groups, and why our testing strategy must align with this risk," Winde said.

The premier said that with country on level 3, this poses increased risk of infection as there will be more people moving around, which why it is important for those who falls in the vulnerable groupings to take particular care of themselves. 

"Staying at home will always be the single most important step you can take to protect yourself and we encourage all of those who do fall into these groups to remain at home as much as possible. The golden rules of hygiene, social distancing and wearing a mask are also important prevention steps," he said.

"For those who do not fall into these groups, you still have a responsibility to help protect both yourself and those around you who may fall into these groups. 

"You can help by offering to help those in vulnerable groups – shopping for groceries, going to the pharmacy or running errands so that they do not go out into public. You can also help by ensuring that you are abiding by the golden rules at all times," Winde said.

Recoveries:

Winde shared the recovery of Ndumiso Mavimbela of Delft, who was released from Tygerberg Hospital last week after a 32-day stay, which also included time on a ventilator and in the ICU. 

"Mr Mavimbela falls into one of the risk groups, having recently been diagnosed with hypertension. His story is one of hope and we wish him well as he continues on his road to recovery. 

"I would also like to thank the Tygerberg Hospital team who provided him with the excellent medical care that helped him to recover," he said.

Mavimbela is among the over 12 400 people have recovered from Covid-19 in the Western Cape. 

The full story can be read here: Delft man beats Covid-19 after spending seven days on a ventilator

Khayelitsha temporary hospital:

On Monday, a temporary hospital built by Medicins Sans Frontiers in Khayelitsha, in collaboration with the City of Cape Town and the Western Cape Government, opened its doors. The premier said on Tuesday the hospital accepted its first patients for treatment. 

"This hospital will allow for people from the nearby community to receive care and will work closely with the Khayelitsha hospital. We send our wishes to the patients and to the healthcare workers who are providing them with care," Winde said.

Cape Argus

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