Interviews for the Western Cape’s first children’s commissioner started Monday at the provincial legislature and continue until Wednesday. File Picture: Tracey Adams/African News Agency (ANA)
Interviews for the Western Cape’s first children’s commissioner started Monday at the provincial legislature and continue until Wednesday. File Picture: Tracey Adams/African News Agency (ANA)

Western Cape seeks commissioner for children

By Mthuthuzeli Ntseku Time of article published Feb 18, 2020

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Cape Town - Interviews for the Western Cape’s first children’s commissioner started Monday at the provincial legislature and continue until Wednesday.

The province is the first to pass a Commissioner for Children Act, which is seen as a crucial step in prioritising children’s safety and well-being .

Chairperson of the provincial standing committee on social development, Gillion Bosman, said: “I am pleased that we are reaching the completion of the process of appointing a children’s commissioner in the province.

“We are grateful for the number of NGOs and members of the public who have participated in this extensive process.

“Children remain one of the most vulnerable groups in society that are affected by the increasing levels of crime and domestic violence in our communities.

“The establishment of a commissioner for children in the Western Cape is not only a victory for child rights advocates, but more importantly for children themselves,” he said.

Bosman said the appointment of a children’s commissioner was a crucial step towards addressing the interests and protection of children.

However, Molo Songololo director Patric Solomons said NGOs had not received feedback from Bosman’s committee.

A total of 42 child rights organisations wrote to the committee last week asking it to consider a civil society representative on their interview panel, and have made recommendations on criteria to be used to assess candidates for the position.

The NGOs said that in the process of appointing a commissioner there had been a lack of public participation, and especially the participation and involvement of children.

@Mtuzeli

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Cape Argus

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