The St Petersburg Ballet Theatre will bring its grand, full-length production of the immortal ‘Swan Lake’ to South Africa’s most prestigious theatres next year.
Following sold-out seasons in London, Paris and Sydney, the St Petersburg Ballet Theatre brings its grand, full-length production of the immortal Swan Lake to South Africa’s most prestigious theatres next year.

The unmissable and stirring ballet will be accompanied by the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra and Johannesburg Festival Orchestra.

In its 25th anniversary year, St Petersburg Ballet Theatre continues to champion the classical masterpieces with its graceful Vaganova trained company of dancers and breathtaking scenery and costumes.

First performed in St Petersburg in 1895, Swan Lake, with its unrivalled “white acts”, its spectacular and dramatic ballroom scene, sublime music and deeply moving story - is the ballet that towers above all others.

The brilliant bravura dancing of the St Petersburg Ballet Theatre is everything expected from Russian classical ballet.

The ballet tells the classic love story of Prince Siegfried and the Swan Princess Odette torn apart by the villainous sorcerer Rothbart in a story where true love conquers all.

St Petersburg Ballet founding director Konstantin Tachkin said: “I am constantly delighted and encouraged when I see more and more people - young and old - coming to our performances. “Led by Prima Ballerina Irina Kolesnikova, I guarantee our performances here in South Africa will long be remembered”.

Swan Lake will be performed at the Artscape Opera House in Cape Town from April 15 to 19, and at the Teatro at Montecasino in Joburg from April 22 to 26 next year.

Ticket prices range from R250 to R690. There are reduced prices for mid-week and Sunday evening performances, and specials for students and pensioners on Wednesday and Sunday evening performances via Computicket outlets.

Bookings have opened. See https://swanlake.computicket.com/ or call 0861 915 8000 for tickets. Visit www.facebook.com/stpetersburgballet

Cape Times