Men will confront their demons in a series of facilitated dialogues on GBV and femicide, hosted in taverns around Cape Town this week. File Picture.
Men will confront their demons in a series of facilitated dialogues on GBV and femicide, hosted in taverns around Cape Town this week. File Picture.

16 Days of Activism: Tavern Dialogues seeks to help men confront their demons

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Nov 23, 2020

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Cape Town - Men will confront their demons in a series of facilitated dialogues on gender-based violence (GBV) and femicide, hosted in taverns around Cape Town this week.

In light of 16 Days of Activism for No Violence against Women and Children, which kicks off on Wednesday, the dialogues will be hosted at ten taverns in Gugulethu, Delft and Mitchells Plain this weekend.

The initiative was launched by Distell in August, in Tembisa, with sessions already concluded in Orange Farm, Gauteng Province, Port Elizabeth and East London in the Eastern Cape, and uMlazi, Inanda and KwaMashu in KwaZulu-Natal.

The Tavern Dialogues are held in areas with the highest incidence of GBV and femicide, and are facilitated by subject matter experts, designed to educate and equip men to drive positive change in their communities.

Convenor of the liquor trader formations, Lucky Ntimane said taverns were social and economic hubs of township communities, and have an important role to play in upholding community values and promoting responsible drinking.

“This includes taking the lead in eliminating gender-based violence and femicide. Our taverns must be safe spaces for positive social interaction and this is why we wanted to take this initiative. With the litany of reports of women and children being hurt and killed by men, it is time for men to take a stand and lead the fight against GBV and femicide,” said Ntimane.

Provincial Liquor Authority acting chief executive advocate Leatitia Petersen commended the efforts of the National Liquor Traders Council to reduce the harm caused by liquor, in aiming to create safer, more cohesive communities.

“The national lockdown to prevent the spread of Covid-19 and the subsequent liquor ban have clearly demonstrated the role that liquor plays in the high rates of violence in this province. It is crucial that license holders comply with their liquor licence conditions and the National Disaster Management Regulations, to ensure responsible liquor trading and consumption,” said Petersen.

Cape Times

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