Scarface
Scarface

Betty’s Bay baboon Scarface gets stay of execution

By Siphokazi Vuso Time of article published Jul 14, 2021

Share this article:

Cape Town - The Overstrand Strategic Baboon Joint Task Team has said that beloved Betty’s Bay male baboon, Scarface, will not be euthanised at this stage.

This followed an outcry from several activists who had feared that Scarface would be killed on Tuesday, following the submission of incident reports.

The animal has been alleged to be raiding homes in the area.

However, CapeNature confirmed on Tuesday that it has not received any permit application to euthanise the baboon.

Overstrand Municipality said in a statement that the task team considered all the information available and concluded that the baboon in question should not be euthanised at this stage.

“The Overstrand Strategic Baboon Joint Task Team met on July 13, 2021. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the report regarding the behaviour of BBM1, an adult male baboon in the Betty’s Bay area. The report was prepared in accordance with the Guidelines for Baboon Management in Urban Areas.

“The meeting was attended by the Overstrand Municipality, CapeNature and an independent scientific Adviser. The task team considered all the information available and concluded that the baboon in question should not be euthanised at this stage.

The task team requested that other alternative and additional non-lethal methods be investigated and discussed with the relevant role-players,” the municipality said.

The municipality said the task team has also decided to wait for the report of the independent scientific assessor, appointed earlier this month, before any further decisions are taken.

Resident, Astrid Twomey, said Scarface was a “gentle soul” who has not hurt anyone.

“This baboon is not aggressive whatsoever. Responsible human behaviour is the key to human-baboon co-existence. If people diligently and effectively store their food waste in baboon-proof bins and baboon-proof their homes, baboons will have minimal access to human-based food,” she said.

HWS behavioural ecologist Dr Phil Richardson said he recommended that the baboon be sent to a rehabilitation centre.

Cape Times

Share this article: