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Juvenile female baboon rescued from thick wire snare

The CoGH SPCA said a long acting antibiotic was administered as a precaution to mitigate possible infection.

The CoGH SPCA said a long acting antibiotic was administered as a precaution to mitigate possible infection.

Published Feb 20, 2022

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CAPE TOWN - A juvenile baboon was rescued from imminent death at the weekend after animal welfare workers removed a thick wire snare that had cut deep into her neck.

NCC Environmental Services said they had called the Cape of Good Hope SPCA’s (CoGH SPCA) wildlife department to assist in rescuing the young female baboon from the MT2 (Mountain Troop 2) along the Cape Peninsula.

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Minette Pieterse, NCC field manager, detected a snare around the baboon’s neck.

“Inspector Elani Graham and wildlife officer Jon Friedman arrived on the scene with a cage trap and wire-cutting equipment,” the CoGH SPCA said.

“Upon their arrival, it became evident a cage trap approach would not suffice to capture the low-ranking female for treatment.

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“The CoGH SPCA called in wildlife veterinarian Dr Greg Simpson to dart the juvenile baboon safely.

“Once the baboon was asleep, the team found that the thick wire snare had already cut deep into the baboon’s neck. Dr Simpson had to surgically remove the wire, only millimetres away from the jugular vein, right there in the field.

“The wire was removed and the wound cleaned.”

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The CoGH SPCA said a long acting antibiotic was administered as a precaution to mitigate possible infection.

The baboon was allowed to wake up fully while being monitored and was successfully released back with the troop.

“Last year, four baboons were rescued from snares across the Cape Peninsula. Lately, snares have become all too common and continue to ensnare our wildlife indiscriminately,” the CoGH SPCA cautioned.

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Cape Times

Related Topics:

conservation

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